~whynothugo/systemd-lock-handler

3454a9199fec581010117e369e63c0a5c24fec5b — Hugo Osvaldo Barrera 2 months ago b1b8e56 v2.1.0
Improve the README a bit more
1 files changed, 9 insertions(+), 8 deletions(-)

M README.md
M README.md => README.md +9 -8
@@ 1,24 1,24 @@
systemd-lock-handler
====================

`logind` (part of systemd) emits events when the system is lock or goes into
`logind` (part of systemd) emits events when the system is locked or goes into
sleep.

These events though, are simple D-Bus events, and don't actually run anything.
These events however, are simple D-Bus events, and don't actually run anything.
There are no facilities to easily _run_ anything on these events either (e.g.:
a screen locker).

This application fills this gap.
`systemd-lock-handler` application fills this gap.

When the system is either locked, or about to go into sleep, this service will
start the `lock.target` and `sleep.target` systemd targets respectively.
start the `lock.target` and `sleep.target` systemd user targets respectively.

You can then have any of your own services (including screen lockers and other
one-shot commands) run when this event is activated.

Note that systemd already has a `sleep.target`, however, that's a
system-level target, and your user-level units can't rely on it. The one
included in this package does not conflict, but rather compliments that one.
Note that systemd already has a `sleep.target`, however, that's a system-level
target, and your user-level units can't rely on it. The one included in this
package does not conflict, but rather compliments that one.

Installation
------------


@@ 46,7 46,8 @@ example, `enabling` this service file would run `slock`:

    [Unit]
    Description=A simple X screen locker
    Requisite=xorg.target
    Requisite=xorg.target  # Optional, non-standard
    PartOf=lock.target  # Stop this unit if lock.target is stopped.

    [Service]
    ExecStart=/usr/bin/slock