~talos/website

0c76316eb3c66617e7dcba30a19fcd933738b6b8 — Jordan Newport 1 year, 4 months ago 3191ea7
Update blog post
2 files changed, 38 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)

M blog/cli-mail.html
M blog/cli-mail.md
M blog/cli-mail.html => blog/cli-mail.html +15 -0
@@ 30,6 30,19 @@ intended to walk through some of the infrastructure you'll need to set up. As
always, the Arch Wiki is an excellent source of information on these as well.</p>
<p>All configurations in this post are taken from
<a href="https://sr.ht/%7Etalos/dotfiles">my dotfiles</a>.</p>
<h3>Quick overview</h3>
<p>We're going to need three pieces of software for this.</p>
<p>The first is a tool that doesn't seem to have a formal category name, but which
I will call a &quot;mail fetcher&quot;. It syncs mail between your local machine that
you're reading and writing mail on, and the server that is hosting that mail.
We'll install <strong>mbsync</strong> for this purpose.</p>
<p>The second is a &quot;mail transfer agent&quot;, which sends mail through a mail server.
We'll install <strong>msmtp</strong> for this purpose.</p>
<p>The third is a &quot;mail user agent&quot;, which functions as a mail client where we can
read and write mail. We'll install <strong>mutt</strong> for this purpose.</p>
<p>Mbsync and msmtp should be mostly background tools after they're first set up;
you should only rarely need to interact directly with them. The bulk of your
interactions as a user will be with the MUA, mutt.</p>
<p>Quick contextual notes: IMAP is a protocol for fetching email from a server. It
supplanted the older POP3. SMTP is a protocol for sending email. A MUA is a
&quot;mail user agent&quot;; it's basically a mail client that lets you look at and


@@ 583,6 596,8 @@ MTA, and email fetcher by logging into the server during use. The configuration
for this looks totally different, I don't have one for you to look at, and it
requires that you be online (and on the VPN, and so on) all the time. The
advantage here is that you don't need to install a mail fetcher or MTA.</p>
<hr>
<p>Comments? Questions? Email me at <a href="mailto:jordan@jnewport.dev">jordan@jnewport.dev</a>!</p>
<footer>
  <noscript> <hr> Thank you for blocking Javascript. </noscript>
  <hr>

M blog/cli-mail.md => blog/cli-mail.md +23 -0
@@ 36,6 36,25 @@ always, the Arch Wiki is an excellent source of information on these as well.
All configurations in this post are taken from
[my dotfiles](https://sr.ht/~talos/dotfiles).

### Quick overview

We're going to need three pieces of software for this.

The first is a tool that doesn't seem to have a formal category name, but which
I will call a "mail fetcher". It syncs mail between your local machine that
you're reading and writing mail on, and the server that is hosting that mail.
We'll install **mbsync** for this purpose.

The second is a "mail transfer agent", which sends mail through a mail server.
We'll install **msmtp** for this purpose.

The third is a "mail user agent", which functions as a mail client where we can
read and write mail. We'll install **mutt** for this purpose.

Mbsync and msmtp should be mostly background tools after they're first set up;
you should only rarely need to interact directly with them. The bulk of your
interactions as a user will be with the MUA, mutt.

Quick contextual notes: IMAP is a protocol for fetching email from a server. It
supplanted the older POP3. SMTP is a protocol for sending email. A MUA is a
"mail user agent"; it's basically a mail client that lets you look at and


@@ 609,6 628,10 @@ for this looks totally different, I don't have one for you to look at, and it
requires that you be online (and on the VPN, and so on) all the time. The
advantage here is that you don't need to install a mail fetcher or MTA.

<hr>

Comments? Questions? Email me at <jordan@jnewport.dev>!

<footer>
  <noscript> <hr> Thank you for blocking Javascript. </noscript>
  <hr>