~sivers/sive.rs

ref: 89db8a0db3b15ad1a131b443ccfe2a0d5f08170a sive.rs/site/mindset -rw-r--r-- 5.1 KiB
89db8a0d — Derek Sivers formatting 4 months ago
                                                                                
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en" dir="ltr">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<title>Fixed mindset vs Growth mindset | Derek Sivers</title>
<meta name="description" content="One of the most important concepts I’ve learned is the difference between the “fixed” mindset and the “growth” mindset.">
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/style.css">
<link rel="alternate" type="application/atom+xml" title="Derek Sivers" href="/en.atom">
<link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" title="Derek Sivers podcast" href="/podcast.rss">
<link rel="prev" href="https://sive.rs/lw">
<link rel="next" href="https://sive.rs/career">
</head>
<body id="article">
<section id="masthead">
<h1><a href="/" title="Derek Sivers">Derek Sivers</a></h1>
</section>
<div id="content">

<article>
<header>
<div class="blogparent"><a href="/blog">Articles</a>:</div>
<h1>Fixed mindset vs Growth mindset</h1>
<small>2014-09-21</small>
</header>

<p>
	One of the most important concepts I’ve learned is the difference between the “fixed” mindset and the “growth” mindset.
</p><p>
	It’s a little bit like “nature vs nurture”:
</p><p>
	People in a <strong>fixed</strong> mindset believe you either are or aren’t good at something, based on your inherent nature, because it’s just who you are.
</p><p>
	People in a <strong>growth</strong> mindset believe anyone can be good at anything, because your abilities are entirely due to your actions.
</p><p>
	This sounds simple, but it’s surprisingly deep.
	<strong>The fixed mindset is the most common and the most harmful</strong>, so it’s worth understanding and considering how it’s affecting you.
</p><p>
	For example:
</p><p>
	In a fixed mindset, you believe “She’s a natural born singer” or “I’m just no good at dancing.”
</p><p>
	In a growth mindset, you believe “Anyone can be good at anything. Skill comes only from practice.”
</p><p>
<strong>
	The fixed mindset believes trouble is devastating.
</strong>
	If you believe, “You’re either naturally great or will never be great,” then when you have any trouble, your mind thinks, “See? You’ll never be great at this. Give up now.”
</p><p>
	The growth mindset believes trouble is just important feedback in the learning process.
</p><p>
	Can you see how this subtle difference in mindset can change everything?
</p>
<p><strong>
	More examples:
</strong></p>
<p>
	In a <strong>fixed</strong> mindset, you want to hide your flaws so you’re not judged or labeled a failure.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>growth</strong> mindset, your flaws are just a TO-DO list of things to improve.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>fixed</strong> mindset, you stick with what you know to keep up your confidence.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>growth</strong> mindset, you keep up your confidence by always pushing into the unfamiliar, to make sure you’re always learning.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>fixed</strong> mindset, you look inside yourself to find your true passion and purpose, as if this is a hidden inherent thing.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>growth</strong> mindset, you commit to mastering valuable skills regardless of mood, knowing passion and purpose come from doing great work, which comes from expertise and experience.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>fixed</strong> mindset, failures define you.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>growth</strong> mindset, failures are temporary setbacks.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>fixed</strong> mindset, you believe if you’re romantically compatible with someone, you should share all of each other’s views, and everything should just come naturally.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>growth</strong> mindset, you believe a lasting relationship comes from effort and working through inevitable differences.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>fixed</strong> mindset, it’s all about the outcome. If you fail, you think all effort was wasted.
</p><p>
	In a <strong>growth</strong> mindset, it’s all about the process, so the outcome hardly matters.
</p>
<hr/>
<p>
	And yes, the mindset itself is not fixed.
	You can change your mindset just by thinking it through.
</p><p>
	I’ve talked about this in <a href="/ml">my “Meaning of Life” talk</a>, and <a href="/failure">my “Why You Need to Fail” talk</a>, if you’re interested in checking those out, too.
</p><p>
	But I get no credit for these insights.
	This is all from <a href="/book/Mindset">Carol Dweck’s book, “Mindset”</a>, and <a href="/book/ArtOfLearning">Josh Waitzkin’s book, “The Art of Learning”</a>, both of which I highly recommend.
</p>
<a href="/book/Mindset"><img src="/images/Mindset.gif" alt="Mindset — by Carol Dweck"></a>
&nbsp;
<a href="/book/ArtOfLearning"><img src="/images/ArtOfLearning.gif" alt="Art of Learning — by Josh Waitzkin"></a>

<footer>
© 2014 <a href="https://sive.rs/">Derek Sivers</a>.
(
  « <a href="/lw" accesskey="p" rel="prev">previous</a>
    ||
  <a href="/career" accesskey="n" rel="next">next</a> »
)
<h1>
  Copy &amp; share:
  <span class="url"><a href="https://sive.rs/mindset">sive.rs/mindset</a></span>
</h1>
</footer>
</article>
<div id="comments"></div>
<script type="text/javascript" src="/js/comments.js"></script>

</div>
</body>
</html>