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ref: 89db8a0db3b15ad1a131b443ccfe2a0d5f08170a sive.rs/site/confidence -rw-r--r-- 5.6 KiB
89db8a0d — Derek Sivers formatting 4 months ago
                                                                                
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<title>Confidence required | Derek Sivers</title>
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<div class="blogparent"><a href="/blog">Articles</a>:</div>
<h1>Confidence required</h1>
<small>2009-11-21</small>
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<p>
	Most of the time, we are working hard, head down, using what we know.
</p><p>
	We get better and better at it.
	We make little improvements, and keep working.
	Our expertise and confidence keeps increasing.
</p><p>
	We can’t afford to stop and question everything.
	We can’t go back to school.
	We have work to do.
</p><p>
	Until we don’t.
</p><p>
	Last year I left my company, and decided to start a new one.
</p><p>
	I wanted to <strong>replace my old thoughts with new ones</strong>.
	I had been working hard, doing one thing in one mindset for ten years, and needed to install a new operating system in my brain.
</p><p>
	I read <a href="/book">a lot of books</a> on <a href="/book/EMythRevisited">business</a>, <a href="/book/Influence">social psychology</a>, <a href="/book/UltimateSalesMachine">management</a>, <a href="/book/HowWeDecide">behavioral economics</a>, <a href="/book/FourPillarsOfInvesting">investing</a>, <a href="/book/PredictablyIrrational">cognitive biases</a>, <a href="/book/WisdomOfCrowds">crowds</a>, <a href="/book/CultingOfBrands">marketing</a>, <a href="/book/NeverEatAlone">networking</a>, <a href="/book/ArtOfLearning">learning</a>, and <a href="/book/YouInc">communication</a>.
</p><p>
	But each book that made me feel smarter (“Aha! I think I understand the world better now!”) also made me feel dumber (“Wow, I’ve been an idiot. It’s surprising I survived at all.”)
</p><p>
	For example, when I read “<a href="/book/WhatGotYouThere">What Got You Here Won’t Get You There</a>”, I realized what a horrible manager I’d been — how I’ve been dealing with people all wrong.
	It felt like the author had been hiding under my desk, making a list of what not to do, and he was right.
	I’ve got so much to learn to be a good manager.
</p><p>
	Business experts like <a href="/book/Execution">Ram Charan</a>, <a href="/book/InnovatorsSolution">Clayton Christensen</a>, <a href="/book/ArtOfProfitability">Adrian Slywotzky</a> and <a href="http://www.poorcharliesalmanack.com/">Charlie Munger</a> made me feel like a court jester next to a samurai.
	I long to have their insight and expertise.
	I could study hard for decades and barely catch up.
</p><p>
	Plus an ex-employee I’d fired, and an ex-girlfriend I’d broken up with, made sure I knew what a horrible horrible person I am.
	Not only am I an idiot, I’m dangerous!
	Destroying others in my path.
</p><p>
<strong>
	It was all very humbling.
</strong>
</p><p>
	So humbling, that I found it hard to do anything at all.
</p><p>
	I had designed and announced my new company.
	I was psyched for it to exist.
	But when it came down to doing the necessary work, I hesitated and procrastinated.
	“Who am I to be starting another company? I’m just going to fuck it up like last time.“
</p><p>
	After all I’ve learned, I can’t believe anyone actually thinks they’ll succeed in the complex world of business.
	Don’t they see all the really smart people who have tried and failed?
</p><p>
	I can’t believe how foolish I was to start my first company.
	Just <a href="http://www.jpfolks.com/ECRoadTrip00/ECpages/cdbaby.html">me in my bedroom</a> with no experience, making a little website, when I was up against giant IPO-funded competitors.
</p><p>
	I was an over-confident punk, thinking I had the answer, and everyone else didn’t.
</p><p>
	But it worked.
</p><p>
	And in fact, <strong>isn’t that kind of confidence absolutely required to get anything done?</strong>
</p><p>
	Isn’t the role of the entrepreneur to be the bold, daring, audacious one?
	The over-confident reckless one who says, “<a href="https://www.virgin.com/richard-branson/books/screw-it-lets-do-it">Screw it. Let’s do it!</a>”?
</p><p>
	Yes! Of course! It’s the essential final lesson: that <strong>all this learning means nothing until you make something happen</strong>.
</p><p>
	Whether you think you’ll win or not, you need to jump in the game, and say, “Let’s go!”
</p><p>
	Whether your confidence is naïve, inspired, or crafted, you need its high-horsepower engine to get uphill and go anywhere.
</p><p>
	And no matter how humbling the lessons of life are, this final lesson is the most important of all.
</p><p>
	And thus, I graduated from my self-created Entrepreneur 102 class.
</p><p>
	Time to go make something happen.
</p>

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