~seirdy/seirdy.one

a1f517c61a2753557c5e8371a3c900daf88a8ff1 — rohan kumar 10 months ago 2d43a0d
Clarify that branding isn't evil
2 files changed, 6 insertions(+), 5 deletions(-)

M content/posts/website-best-practices.gmi
M content/posts/website-best-practices.md
M content/posts/website-best-practices.gmi => content/posts/website-best-practices.gmi +1 -1
@@ 28,7 28,7 @@ Early rough drafts of this post generated some feedback I thought I should addre

If you really want, you could use serif instead of sans-serif, but serif fonts tend to look worse on low-res monitors. Not every screen's DPI has three digits.

To ship custom fonts is to assert that branding is more important than user choice. Beyond basic layout and optionally supporting dark mode, authors should not dictate the presentation of their websites; that is the job of the user agent. Most websites are not important enough to look completely different from the rest of the user's system.
To ship custom fonts is to assert that branding is more important than user choice. That might very well be a reasonable thing to do; branding isn't evil! It isn't *usually* the case for textual websites, though. Beyond basic layout and optionally supporting dark mode, authors generally shouldn't dictate the presentation of their websites; that is the job of the user agent. Most websites are not important enough to look completely different from the rest of the user's system.

A personal example: I set my preferred fonts in my computer's fontconfig settings. Now every website that uses sans-serif will have my preferred font. Sites with sans-serif blend into the users' systems instead of sticking out.


M content/posts/website-best-practices.md => content/posts/website-best-practices.md +5 -4
@@ 56,10 56,11 @@ If you *really* want, you could use `serif` instead of `sans-serif`, but serif f
tend to look worse on low-res monitors. Not every screen's DPI has three digits.

To ship custom fonts is to assert that branding is more important than user choice.
Beyond basic layout and optionally supporting dark mode, authors should not dictate
the presentation of their websites; that is the job of the user agent. Most websites
are not important enough to look completely different from the rest of the user's
system.
That might very well be a reasonable thing to do; branding isn't evil! It isn't
*usually* the case for textual websites, though. Beyond basic layout and optionally
supporting dark mode, authors generally shouldn't dictate the presentation of their
websites; that is the job of the user agent. Most websites are not important enough
to look completely different from the rest of the user's system.

A personal example: I set my preferred fonts in my computer's fontconfig settings.
Now every website that uses `sans-serif` will have my preferred font. Sites with