~samiam/MaraDNS

04c9935ffbb38439c17d93d83c0388005a63dcf0 — Sam Trenholme a month ago fea3b36
Docs: Autobuild docs with notes about comment types
M deadwood-github/doc/Deadwood.1 => deadwood-github/doc/Deadwood.1 +35 -1
@@ 4,7 4,7 @@
.\" Process this file with the following
.\" nroff -man -Tutf8 maradns.8 | tr '\020' ' '
.\"
.\" Last updated Sat May 15 02:52:42 2021
.\" Last updated Sun Aug 22 05:45:49 2021
.\"
.TH DEADWOOD 1 "August 2009" DEADWOOD "Deadwood reference"
.\" We don't want hyphenation (it's too ugly)


@@ 927,6 927,40 @@ program); Deadwood, at runtime, uses /dev/urandom (secret.txt in
Windows)
as a hardcoded path to get entropy (along with the timestamp) for the
hash algorithm.
.SH "COMMENTS"
.PP
Deadwood\(aqs configuration file format supports two kinds of comments:

.nf
# This is a comment
.fi

Here, a comment starts with the # character and continues until the
end of the line. In some circumstances, a comment can start after a
variable is set, for example:

.nf
bind_address="127.0.0.1" # IP we bind to
.fi

The second comment type supports multi-line comments. For example:

.nf
_rem={}
_rem={ #_rem --[=[
"""
 We are now in a multi-line comment.
 This allows a long explanation to be
 in a Deadwood configuration file
""" # ]=]
}
.fi

The actual format is _rem={ at the start of a line, which begins a
multi-line comment. The comment continues until a } is seen. The reason
for this unusual format is that it allows a Deadwood configuration file
to have multi-line comments in a form which are compatible with both
Lua and Python, as can be seen in the above example.
.SH "DAEMONIZATION"
.PP
Deadwood does not have any built-in daemonization facilities; this is

M deadwood-github/doc/Deadwood.html => deadwood-github/doc/Deadwood.html +36 -1
@@ 1,6 1,6 @@
<!-- Do *not* edit this file; it was automatically generated by ej2html
     Look for a name.ej file with the same name as this filename -->
<!-- Last updated Sat May 15 02:52:42 2021 -->
<!-- Last updated Sun Aug 22 05:45:50 2021 -->

<HTML><HEAD>



@@ 791,6 791,41 @@ program); Deadwood, at runtime, uses /dev/urandom (secret.txt in Windows)
as a hardcoded path to get entropy (along with the timestamp) for the
hash algorithm.

<h1>COMMENTS</h1>

Deadwood's configuration file format supports two kinds of comments:

<pre>
# This is a comment
</pre>

Here, a comment starts with the # character and continues until the
end of the line.  In some circumstances, a comment can start after a
variable is set, for example:

<pre>
bind_address="127.0.0.1" # IP we bind to
</pre>

The second comment type supports multi-line comments.  For example:

<pre>
_rem={}
_rem={ #_rem --[=[
"""
 We are now in a multi-line comment.
 This allows a long explanation to be
 in a Deadwood configuration file
""" # ]=]
}
</pre>

The actual format is _rem={ at the start of a line, which begins a
multi-line comment. The comment continues until a } is seen. The reason
for this unusual format is that it allows a Deadwood configuration file
to have multi-line comments in a form which are compatible with both
Lua and Python, as can be seen in the above example.

<h1>DAEMONIZATION</h1>

Deadwood does not have any built-in daemonization facilities; this is 

M deadwood-github/doc/Deadwood.txt => deadwood-github/doc/Deadwood.txt +26 -0
@@ 671,6 671,32 @@ verbose_level
   (secret.txt in Windows) as a hardcoded path to get entropy (along with
   the timestamp) for the hash algorithm.

                                    COMMENTS

   Deadwood's configuration file format supports two kinds of comments:
# This is a comment

   Here, a comment starts with the # character and continues until the end
   of the line. In some circumstances, a comment can start after a
   variable is set, for example:
bind_address="127.0.0.1" # IP we bind to

   The second comment type supports multi-line comments. For example:
_rem={}
_rem={ #_rem --[=[
"""
 We are now in a multi-line comment.
 This allows a long explanation to be
 in a Deadwood configuration file
""" # ]=]
}

   The actual format is _rem={ at the start of a line, which begins a
   multi-line comment. The comment continues until a } is seen. The reason
   for this unusual format is that it allows a Deadwood configuration file
   to have multi-line comments in a form which are compatible with both
   Lua and Python, as can be seen in the above example.

                                 DAEMONIZATION

   Deadwood does not have any built-in daemonization facilities; this is