~rbdr/gemlog

c34f2e28ad10b34f4c5a1fb3f0f9b674dd619be0 — Ruben Beltran del Rio 2 months ago 2ea36e8
blog-sync-up-1706113636188
9 files changed, 206 insertions(+), 21 deletions(-)

A archive/1706113636109/metadata.json
A archive/1706113636109/setting-up-net-on-se30.gmi
M posts/0/metadata.json
A posts/0/setting-up-net-on-se30.gmi
M posts/1/metadata.json
R posts/{0/scripts-for-git-admin.gmi => 1/scripts-for-git-admin.gmi}
D posts/2/decentralization-depends-on-access.gmi
M posts/2/metadata.json
R posts/{1/window-management-and-huge-windows.gmi => 2/window-management-and-huge-windows.gmi}
A archive/1706113636109/metadata.json => archive/1706113636109/metadata.json +4 -0
@@ 0,0 1,4 @@
{
  "id": "1706113636109",
  "createdOn": 1706113636109
}
\ No newline at end of file

A archive/1706113636109/setting-up-net-on-se30.gmi => archive/1706113636109/setting-up-net-on-se30.gmi +98 -0
@@ 0,0 1,98 @@
# Setting up Networking on the Macintosh SE/30 Using The Old Net router

Earlier this month I got the RS232 serial modem from The Old Net[1], so I finally got to set up networking on the SE/30!

=> https://www.tindie.com/products/theoldnet/rs232-serial-wifi-modem-for-vintage-computers-v4 [1] Tindie page for the modem

Setting up the modem was straightforward thanks to the included quick start guide. I used MacTerminal first, but this didn't work with PPP so I changed to ZTerm[2] and proceeded to set up my wi-fi credentials:

=> https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/zterm [2] ZTerm @ Macintosh Garden

```
AT
AT$SSID=YOURWIFINETWORK
AT$PASS=YOURWIFIPASSWORD
ATC1
```

Once I confirmed that I could get an IP address, I changed the baud from the safe-but-slow default of 300. While the modem itself supports 115200, the modem port has a max baud of 57600.

```
AT$SB=57600
```

And in ZTerm: Settings > Connection > Data Rate to 57600. After confirming it worked, I saved the settings.

```
AT&W
```

## PPP

I'm using System 7.5.5 so I already have TCP/IP and OpenTransport, but I had to install MacPPP[3].

=> https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/mac-ppp [3] MacPPP

Configuring PPP is easy, and The Old Net provides a video[4], but in Config PPP you need to create a new connection, set the port speed to the baud you selected, and set flow control to None. 

=> https://youtu.be/OCrB4uAbJ0U [4] Video from The Old Net explaining how to set up PPP

Then in ZTerm I can dial to PPP

```
ATDTPPP
```

And click "Open" in Config PPP and that's it!

## Browsers

I have iCab, Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator installed, so I decided to try my own website[5] and play with the services and proxies offered by The Old Net[6]. All three loaded well except for displaying unicode characters incorrectly.

=> https://www.unlimited.pizza [5] My Own Website
=> http://theoldnet.com [6] The Old Net

Netscape Navigator has OK performance and was able to load the website well, it has some issues identifying JS files which means you get a download screen, but otherwise nothing major. I disabled Javascript and Java by going to Options > Network Preferences > Languages

iCab seemed to deal better but it's extremely sluggish, I don't think it's suitable for this computer and I wouldn't recommend it.

Internet Explorer landed somewhere in the middle for me: Slower than Netscape but usable, and better at rendering HTML. I also disabled Java and Javascript by goign to Edit > Preferences > Web Content, and Edit > Preferences > Java

## Other Apps

One thing I was able to test was wallops[7], an IRC app. This one is pretty speedy, and let me connect to libera chat no problem. Other than having to type the identify, I can actually see myself loading this every time.

=> https://jcs.org/wallops [7] wallops by jcs

Macstodon[8], a client for mastodon was too slow and I didn't manage to authenticate at all. I might have been using an earlier version so I plan to give this another run.

=> https://github.com/smallsco/macstodon [8] macstodon

Joshua Stein, the author of wallops has some other handy classic mac apps. Notably wikipedia[9], however this one worked on and off.

=> https://jcs.org/wikipedia [9] wikipedia by jcs

## AppleShare

One thing I did want to try was accessing a network drive using netatalk. I set up netatalk on raspberry pi and set it to serve the same directory I use in my samba share.

The version of AppleShare I was using didn't let me specify an IP address, so I had to update AppleShare to version 3.7.4[10] and Open Transpot 1.1.2[11], but after this it actually worked but it was R E A L L Y S L O O W and froze the whole finder.

I'm not sure if the issue is on the server or the mac so I decided to leave it be for now.

=> https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/appleshare-client-372 [10] AppleShare Client 3.x
=> https://macintoshrepository.org/44248-open-transport-1-1-2 [11] Open Transport 1.1.2

## Moving Files Back and Forth

Since AppleShare didn't work, I needed an alternative to move files back and forth. I settled with FTP. I'm running vsftpd on a raspberry pi and that's how I got this file out of the computer and into the blog.

On the mac I'm using Fetch[12], which is pretty nice (though I might consider other apps as the window size for fetch is huge.

=> https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/fetch-212 [12] Fetch

## What's Next?

I want to build a small tool that lets me publish my blog directly from the mac. I reckon I'll still have to use the raspberry pi to provide most of the functionality, but if I can write a file and drag it to a window and see it live, I'll be happy!

This blog was authored on a Macintosh SE/30 using Anarcho 1.6.

M posts/0/metadata.json => posts/0/metadata.json +2 -2
@@ 1,4 1,4 @@
{
  "id": "1705848860112",
  "createdOn": 1705848860112
  "id": "1706113636109",
  "createdOn": 1706113636109
}
\ No newline at end of file

A posts/0/setting-up-net-on-se30.gmi => posts/0/setting-up-net-on-se30.gmi +98 -0
@@ 0,0 1,98 @@
# Setting up Networking on the Macintosh SE/30 Using The Old Net router

Earlier this month I got the RS232 serial modem from The Old Net[1], so I finally got to set up networking on the SE/30!

=> https://www.tindie.com/products/theoldnet/rs232-serial-wifi-modem-for-vintage-computers-v4 [1] Tindie page for the modem

Setting up the modem was straightforward thanks to the included quick start guide. I used MacTerminal first, but this didn't work with PPP so I changed to ZTerm[2] and proceeded to set up my wi-fi credentials:

=> https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/zterm [2] ZTerm @ Macintosh Garden

```
AT
AT$SSID=YOURWIFINETWORK
AT$PASS=YOURWIFIPASSWORD
ATC1
```

Once I confirmed that I could get an IP address, I changed the baud from the safe-but-slow default of 300. While the modem itself supports 115200, the modem port has a max baud of 57600.

```
AT$SB=57600
```

And in ZTerm: Settings > Connection > Data Rate to 57600. After confirming it worked, I saved the settings.

```
AT&W
```

## PPP

I'm using System 7.5.5 so I already have TCP/IP and OpenTransport, but I had to install MacPPP[3].

=> https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/mac-ppp [3] MacPPP

Configuring PPP is easy, and The Old Net provides a video[4], but in Config PPP you need to create a new connection, set the port speed to the baud you selected, and set flow control to None. 

=> https://youtu.be/OCrB4uAbJ0U [4] Video from The Old Net explaining how to set up PPP

Then in ZTerm I can dial to PPP

```
ATDTPPP
```

And click "Open" in Config PPP and that's it!

## Browsers

I have iCab, Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator installed, so I decided to try my own website[5] and play with the services and proxies offered by The Old Net[6]. All three loaded well except for displaying unicode characters incorrectly.

=> https://www.unlimited.pizza [5] My Own Website
=> http://theoldnet.com [6] The Old Net

Netscape Navigator has OK performance and was able to load the website well, it has some issues identifying JS files which means you get a download screen, but otherwise nothing major. I disabled Javascript and Java by going to Options > Network Preferences > Languages

iCab seemed to deal better but it's extremely sluggish, I don't think it's suitable for this computer and I wouldn't recommend it.

Internet Explorer landed somewhere in the middle for me: Slower than Netscape but usable, and better at rendering HTML. I also disabled Java and Javascript by goign to Edit > Preferences > Web Content, and Edit > Preferences > Java

## Other Apps

One thing I was able to test was wallops[7], an IRC app. This one is pretty speedy, and let me connect to libera chat no problem. Other than having to type the identify, I can actually see myself loading this every time.

=> https://jcs.org/wallops [7] wallops by jcs

Macstodon[8], a client for mastodon was too slow and I didn't manage to authenticate at all. I might have been using an earlier version so I plan to give this another run.

=> https://github.com/smallsco/macstodon [8] macstodon

Joshua Stein, the author of wallops has some other handy classic mac apps. Notably wikipedia[9], however this one worked on and off.

=> https://jcs.org/wikipedia [9] wikipedia by jcs

## AppleShare

One thing I did want to try was accessing a network drive using netatalk. I set up netatalk on raspberry pi and set it to serve the same directory I use in my samba share.

The version of AppleShare I was using didn't let me specify an IP address, so I had to update AppleShare to version 3.7.4[10] and Open Transpot 1.1.2[11], but after this it actually worked but it was R E A L L Y S L O O W and froze the whole finder.

I'm not sure if the issue is on the server or the mac so I decided to leave it be for now.

=> https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/appleshare-client-372 [10] AppleShare Client 3.x
=> https://macintoshrepository.org/44248-open-transport-1-1-2 [11] Open Transport 1.1.2

## Moving Files Back and Forth

Since AppleShare didn't work, I needed an alternative to move files back and forth. I settled with FTP. I'm running vsftpd on a raspberry pi and that's how I got this file out of the computer and into the blog.

On the mac I'm using Fetch[12], which is pretty nice (though I might consider other apps as the window size for fetch is huge.

=> https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/fetch-212 [12] Fetch

## What's Next?

I want to build a small tool that lets me publish my blog directly from the mac. I reckon I'll still have to use the raspberry pi to provide most of the functionality, but if I can write a file and drag it to a window and see it live, I'll be happy!

This blog was authored on a Macintosh SE/30 using Anarcho 1.6.

M posts/1/metadata.json => posts/1/metadata.json +2 -2
@@ 1,4 1,4 @@
{
  "id": "1705616805329",
  "createdOn": 1705616805329
  "id": "1705848860112",
  "createdOn": 1705848860112
}
\ No newline at end of file

R posts/0/scripts-for-git-admin.gmi => posts/1/scripts-for-git-admin.gmi +0 -0
D posts/2/decentralization-depends-on-access.gmi => posts/2/decentralization-depends-on-access.gmi +0 -15
@@ 1,15 0,0 @@
# Decentralization Depends on Access

After the experience of setting up my own mastodon instance, it's clear that we have a long way to go to make decentralized web services commonplace: As it is right now, it's not really possible to bring up your own instance without a high investment of money and knowledge. This already severly limits the type of people invited to run the "open web".

The appeal of centralized web services and apps is that it's very easy for anyone to get started because someone else is going to the trouble of setting it up and running it. For decentralization to become the norm we need access to be as easy as that.

Here's what I think is required:

1. It should not require a technical person to get started. Running decentralized services should be as easy as installing an app. This is why I like p2p approaches like We, they're very simple as a user even if internally it's complex.
2. It should not require deep pockets to get started. Ideally it should run well on old or low-spec hardware, and it should be available across platforms.
3. It should not require a huge moderation burden upfront. If I can get started with a few of my friends first and I can build a community from there, that's much better. My community and I should be able to control when / if this particular instance joins the general public.
4. It should allow for easy application development. Drag and drop for most cases, with the option to dive into code (i'm thinking of RPG Maker). Replicating services like twitter or youtube is thinking small. If you abstract away the plumbing and let more people build what they want, then we'll start seeing some apps that only decentralization can bring.
5. It should be free / libre.

I'm sure there's a lot more that goes into it, but I think without those it will never work. People have things to do and problems to solve and will solve them with the tools that they have at hand. I have a lot more faith that peer-to-peer service will achieve this than any of the client-server approaches.

M posts/2/metadata.json => posts/2/metadata.json +2 -2
@@ 1,4 1,4 @@
{
  "id": "1705007731083",
  "createdOn": 1705007731083
  "id": "1705616805329",
  "createdOn": 1705616805329
}
\ No newline at end of file

R posts/1/window-management-and-huge-windows.gmi => posts/2/window-management-and-huge-windows.gmi +0 -0