~rabbits/libreplanet2022

a093cf3d78598141561f692b957ce1131da2adeb — rekkabell 2 years ago f6c80bb
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1 files changed, 28 insertions(+), 23 deletions(-)

M slides
M slides => slides +28 -23
@@ 19,7 19,9 @@ PICT media/rekdev.tga

	- Hello everyone.
	- We are Rekka and Devine. Together we form the Hundred Rabbits artist collective.
	- Live & work from a sailboat named Pino, making tools/books/games.
	- Live & work from a sailboat named Pino, making games, books...
	- We made all the tools we needed to do creative work:
		- Tools for livecoding, drawing, writing, a sprite sheet editor etc.
	- We'll share with you some of the things we learnt living from solar power, and our experiments in learning how to live with less.

NAME [rek] 1.0 Setup


@@ 35,13 37,13 @@ TEXT Name: Pino`Make: Yamaha`Length: 10m`Made: 1982`Origin: Shizuoka, Japan
	- Since 2016, we have circumnavigated the Pacific Ocean.
		- Left from BC Canada>down to Mexico>through South Pacific Islands, NZ, up to Japan and all islands inbetween.
	- Pino is a Japanese boat. A Yamaha.
		- Yamaha makes boats? Well, they did in 1980's.
		- Yamaha made sailboats in the 1980's.
		- We had an instant connection with Pino, because we previously lived in JP for 2 yrs. 
		- One of our favorite places in the world.
		- We thought we could bring Pino back there for its 37th birthday.
		- In the summer of 2020, we sailed from JP to CAD, a 51-day trip at sea
			- It was our longest trip so far.
			- When we arrived in Canada, despite having been at sea for that long we were quarantined for an extra 14 days
			- And the most difficult.
	- For 5 yrs, we lived in remote parts of world.
	- During this time, we saw firsthand how the modern-day computing stack fails/degrades beyond shores of western world.
	- This experience raised a lot of questions.


@@ 80,7 82,7 @@ TEXT We wanted to exit the wasteful loop of acquiring`the necessities of life ea
	- We wanted to live a bit everywhere at the same time.
	- We wanted to stay for longer at each place
		- And familiarize ourselves with the local produce and seasons.
	- We wanted to reduce our posessions to the bare essentials.
	- We wanted to reduce our possessions to the bare essentials.
	- Use only as little technology as needed.
	- We also wanted to carry the tools we need to keep creating things.
		- Becoming nomads is fine and all, but we still love to paint and to compose music.


@@ 94,11 96,12 @@ HEAD Software suddenly has a direct` impact on the way we work.
GOTO 08,12
TEXT We left with Macbooks, iPhones, and used tools like Photoshop and Xcode.

	- To give some context, this is how we started:
	- When we started this whole studio on a sailboat thing, we weren't making our own tools.
	- We left Canada with 2 MacbookPros, 2 Iphones...
		- Used MacOS.
		- I used PS to draw assets
		- We built games with Xcode.
		- We built our games with Xcode.
		- Devine made music with Ableton.
		- Were publishing games on the App store.
		- Relied on cloud services for data storage.
	- Thought we could keep that same setup.


@@ 117,13 120,14 @@ HEAD On the grid,`electricity felt limitless.
GOTO 08,19
TEXT While at anchor, in the beginning,`our solar couldn't keep up with`our demanding work schedules.

	- One of our main issues when first moving onto a boat, was power.
	- The power onboard was limited to the size of our battery bank.
	- When on the grid, electricity feels limitless, but on a boat, available power is limited to the size of the battery bank.
		- Did not know wattage of our devices.
		- Knew even less about the amount of energy needed to power them.
		- Knew nothing about lead acid batteries either, having never driven a car.
	- When living on the grid, electricity felt limitless.
	- In the beginning, when we started to spend more time off the grid. We worked from cafes often to charge our laptops, to spare Pino's batteries. We alternated between working from the boat and from cafes for a while. 
		- We learned many hard lessons, very quickly.
	- In the beginning, our path always included docks with power, but when we started to spend more time off the grid we noticed how much energy our laptops consumed.
	- We stopped using our fridge then, to conserve power, but even that wasn't enough.
	- We would go to cafes often to work, and to charge our laptops to spare Pino's batteries. We alternated between working from the boat and from cafes for a while. 
		- That is, until we reached French Polynesia.
		- In FP, cafes supplying power were not terribly common.
		- We had to rely 100% on the power we could generate ourselves.


@@ 176,10 180,10 @@ HEAD We optimize to need less.
GOTO 08,0c
TEXT Struggle with power demanding software & hardware could have`pushed us to install more solar panels, or extra batteries,`but instead we optimizes to require less.

	- To address the power problem...
	- We had to develop an increased awareness of our power usage. 
	- We developped an increased awareness of our power usage. 
		- Our eyes were fixed on our battery % always.
	- We had to prioritize the draw from other electrical systems onboard.
	- We could no longer afford not to pay attention to this.
	- At times, we had to prioritize the draw from other electrical systems onboard.
		- Keeping our home lit, we knew, was more important than getting work done.
		- We had to accept that the sun dictates work hours.
		- When it dips below a certain point in the horizon, it is our cue to stop working.


@@ 215,6 219,7 @@ HEAD Adapting our`projects to`available resources.
	- But we were not satisfied with how software made use of that hardware.
	- We migrated maps, calendars, TODOS, and daily maintenance tools to paper.
	- Like how we changed halogens for LEDs, we replaced electron apps for native apps.
	- We changed the scale of our projects, in French Polynesia we made a book instead of a game.
	- We prioritized foss programs so we could inspect their inner workings 
		and audit where they spent cycles.



@@ 368,13 373,13 @@ HEAD Have things work`when you need`them to
		- We have solar panels, a gas generator, and our engine's alternator
	- We're not fans of all-in-one tools. 
		- They are convenient. 
		- But there is more chance they'll break, or get in the way.
	- A hand-operated grain mill is good example of a simple tool.
		- But there is more chance they'll break.
	- A hand-operated grain mill is good example of a great, dependable tool.
		- It grinds grains. That's all it does.
		- Doesn't beat your dough or bake bread for you.
		- It's a time-tested design.
		- Does one thing well. 
		- Easy to inspect, making replacement parts is possible.
		- It's a time-tested design, that does one thing well.
		- Easy to take apart, easy to inspect...
		- And making replacement parts is possible.

NAME [rek] 6.1 Resilience boat
FILL 03


@@ 387,10 392,10 @@ HEAD Learning to maintain a boat has`advised how we build software.
		- So, we use hand powered water pumps.
	- Our old diesel heater required electricity to work, while a woodstove does not.
	- Our boat came with a water heater, water pressure, electric windlass, electric diesel heater... we removed it all.
	- We instead prioritized designs that we knew would not break easily.
	- We instead prioritized designs that we knew would be less likely to fail.
		- Designs we knew we could repair.
	- When we mend, we realized that it makes us care. 
		- And because we are, we are more likely to keep maintaining.
		- And because we care, we are more likely to keep maintaining.
	- We like to think that things we learnt working on the boat, we can now carry with us into application development.

NAME [toy] 6.2 Resilience computers


@@ 429,10 434,10 @@ HEAD Community.
		- Eager to share, teach & lend tools.
	-  Friends of ours had dry rot on their wooden hull, and a neighbor with a wooden boat found out about it, he dropped what he was doing and went to help them right away.
		- We never experienced this kind of camraderie when living in a city.
	- Many sailor have personal websites, esp. older sailors. They are a treasure trove of information.
	- Many sailors have personal websites, esp. older sailors. They are a treasure trove of information.
		- The goal is always to share knowledge.
	- We traveled with information gathered from such websites. Some sailors even put together thick compendiums for different countries, with input by hundreds of sailors.
		- The compendium was updated every year, with every passing cohort.
	- We traveled with information gathered from such websites. Some sailors even put together thick compendiums for traveling in different countries, with input by hundreds of contributors.
		- The compendium is updated every year, with every passing cohort.
		- It contained detailed information on where to get parts, local food tips, the location of hospitals, a list of navigational hazards etc.
	- There is a LOT of collaboration in the long-distance sailor community.
		- Information is available, not hidden behind pay-walls.