~rabbits/libreplanet2022

6fca6772ff3df4138be206ada8b8dec9f31d5355 — rekkabell 2 years ago d00f626
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@@ 17,10 17,10 @@ FILL 03
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PICT media/rekdev.tga

	- Hello.
	- We are Rekka and Devine, together we form the 100r artist collective.
	- Live/work from sailboat (Pino), making tools/books/games.
	- We'll share with you some of the things we learnt living from solar power and our experiments in learning to live with less.
	- Hello everyone.
	- We are Rekka and Devine. Together we form the Hundred Rabbits artist collective.
	- Live & work from a sailboat named Pino, making tools/books/games.
	- We'll share with you some of the things we learnt living from solar power, and our experiments in learning how to live with less.

NAME [rek] 1.0 Setup
FILL 03


@@ 32,19 32,22 @@ HEAD Living & working`from a sailboat.
GOTO 08,12
TEXT Name: Pino`Make: Yamaha`Length: 10m`Made: 1982`Origin: Shizuoka, Japan

	- Since 2016, circumnavigated Pacific Ocean.
		- BC Canada>Mexico>South Pacific Islands, NZ, up to Japan and all islands inbetween.
	- Pino is a Japanese boat.
		- We had an instant connection. Because we previously lived in JP for 2 yrs. 
		- Thought we could bring Pino back home.
		- We sailed from JP to CAD in 2020, a 51-day trip at sea (longest trip so far).
		- Funny, quarantined for extra 14 days on arrival.
	- For 5 yrs lived remote parts of world.
	- During this time saw 1sthand how modern-day computing stack fails/degrades beyond shores of western world.
	- Experience raised a lot of questions.
		- How do we keep creating, when tools we use eat away at limited power/connectivity?
		- & how do we make sure that they work when we need them to.
	- These are things we struggled with during time in Pacific.
	- Since 2016, we have circumnavigated the Pacific Ocean.
		- Left from BC Canada>down to Mexico>through South Pacific Islands, NZ, up to Japan and all islands inbetween.
	- Pino is a Japanese boat. A Yamaha.
		- Yamaha makes boats? Well, they did in 1980's.
		- We had an instant connection with Pino, because we previously lived in JP for 2 yrs. 
		- One of our favorite places in the world.
		- We thought we could bring Pino back there for its 37th birthday.
		- In the summer of 2020, we sailed from JP to CAD, a 51-day trip at sea
			- It was our longest trip so far.
			- When we arrived in Canada, despite having been at sea for that long we were quarantined for an extra 14 days
	- For 5 yrs, we lived in remote parts of world.
	- During this time, we saw firsthand how the modern-day computing stack fails/degrades beyond shores of western world.
	- This experience raised a lot of questions.
		- How do we keep creating, when the tools we use eat away at limited power/connectivity?
		- And how do we make sure that they work when we need them to?
	- These things we struggled with during time in Pacific.

NAME [rek] 1.1
FILL 03


@@ 53,13 56,15 @@ PICT media/pinodeco.tga
GOTO 04,0c
HEAD A sailboat,`for all its complexity,`is a version of simplicity,`but of a satisfyingly`complex kind.

	- When we got Pino we knew nothing about sailing
	- Steep learning curve.
	- Devine father’s reaction to us going to sail was: “WHY? You hate going outside!”
		- Our attitude was: well, sailing can't be harder than programming.
		- Still believe that.
	- Sailboats are hulls+sails, elegant, simple systems.
	- But like software, get bogged down with complexity fast, esp when electronics are introduced.
	- When we got Pino, we knew nothing about sailing.
		- We had only stepped onto a boat once before.
	- It was a very steep learning curve.
	- When we shared our intentions of getting a boat with Devine's dad, his reaction was:
		- “Uh...WHY? You hate going outside!”
		- Our attitude was: Well, sailing can't be harder than programming.
		- And we still believe that.
	- Sailboats are hulls and sails. They are elegant, simple systems.
	- But like software, they can get bogged down with complexity fast, esp when electronics are introduced.

NAME [toy] 1.2
FILL 03


@@ 90,17 95,18 @@ GOTO 08,12
TEXT We left with Macbooks, iPhones, and used tools like Photoshop and Xcode.

	- To give some context, this is how we started:
	- Left Canada, with 2 MacbookPros, 2 Iphones, 
	- We left Canada with 2 MacbookPros, 2 Iphones...
		- Used MacOS.
		- PS for assets, built games with Xcode.
		- Were publishing games on App store.
		- Relied on cloud services.
		- I used PS to draw assets
		- We built games with Xcode.
		- Were publishing games on the App store.
		- Relied on cloud services for data storage.
	- Thought we could keep that same setup.
	- But transposing land life to sea life as is, doesn't work.
	- But transposing land life to sea life as is doesn't work.
	- At the time, we were aware of linux
		- But thought it was something fringe
		- Appeared innacessible. 
		- Not known for art and games, we thought.
		- But we thought it was something fringe
		- It appeared innacessible. 
		- It wasn't known for art & games, we thought.

NAME [rek] 2.1 Preconceptions
FILL 03


@@ 111,13 117,14 @@ HEAD On the grid,`electricity felt limitless.
GOTO 08,19
TEXT While at anchor, in the beginning,`our solar couldn't keep up with`our demanding work schedules.

	- Power, we learned, was limited to the size of our battery bank.
	- One of our main issues when first moving onto a boat, was power.
	- The power onboard was limited to the size of our battery bank.
		- Did not know wattage of our devices.
		- Knew even less about the amount of energy needed to power them.
		- Knew nothing about lead acid batteries either, having never driven a car.
	- When on the grid, electricity felt limitless.
	- In the beginning, to spare our batteries, we alternated between working from the boat/outside in cafes for a while.
		- That is until we reached French Polynesia.
	- When living on the grid, electricity felt limitless.
	- In the beginning, when we started to spend more time off the grid. We worked from cafes often to charge our laptops, to spare Pino's batteries. We alternated between working from the boat and from cafes for a while. 
		- That is, until we reached French Polynesia.
		- In FP, cafes supplying power were not terribly common.
		- We had to rely 100% on the power we could generate ourselves.



@@ 131,13 138,12 @@ GOTO 08,20
TEXT Processor intensive software`Cloudy days`Limited space for solar panels

	- Some programs were very processor-intensive, and contributed to our battery drain.
	- GUI tools we were familiar with, didn't match the power available
		- Like, using a graphical application to process photos instead of using a batch script.
	- We could not waste time while working, 
	- The GUI tools we were familiar with, didn't match the power we could harvest from the sun
	- We could not waste time while on the computer, 
		- the window within which we could work was very narrow
		- determined by either the time of day, 
		- or the power available onboard.
	- It was impossible to charge both machines all day, 
	- It was impossible to charge both laptops at once, 
		- so we'd alternate which laptop gets to charge.
	- On grey, cloudy days. We can’t power electronics.
		- It's worse during the winter or rainy season.


@@ 159,7 165,7 @@ TEXT On a sailboat, space is an issue, and so is weight.`The heavier our boat ge
		- It ripped off one of our solar panels
		- We left Japan with 190 W of solar, and we completed the trip with 90 W.
	- More panels would also mean that we need a larger battery bank.
		- Space is an issue, and so is weight. The heavier our boat gets, the slower we sail.
	- Space is an issue, and so is weight. The heavier our boat gets, the slower we sail.

NAME [rek] 2.4 Power Solutions
FILL 03


@@ 171,14 177,14 @@ GOTO 08,0c
TEXT Struggle with power demanding software & hardware could have`pushed us to install more solar panels, or extra batteries,`but instead we optimizes to require less.

	- To address the power problem...
	- We developped an increased awareness of our power usage. 
		- Eyes on battery % always.
	- Prioritized the draw from other electrical systems onboard.
		- keeping our home lit more important than getting work done.
		- !!We had to accept that sun dictates work hours!!
		- When it dips below a certain point it is our cue to stop working.
	- We had to develop an increased awareness of our power usage. 
		- Our eyes were fixed on our battery % always.
	- We had to prioritize the draw from other electrical systems onboard.
		- Keeping our home lit, we knew, was more important than getting work done.
		- We had to accept that the sun dictates work hours.
		- When it dips below a certain point in the horizon, it is our cue to stop working.
	- Time at sea between destinations, different than time at a anchor in lagoon.
		- On transit we don't work, spend that time brainstorming ideas.
		- On transit we don't work, spend that time brainstorming ideas, to plan for projects.
		- We work when at anchor in a safe location.
	- In both situations, must manage and re-allocate resources, depending on what the weather throws at us.



@@ 191,10 197,11 @@ HEAD We began using technology`as little as possible.
GOTO 08,19
TEXT Choosing crank/pedal versions`Do on paper what doesn't need to be digital.`Analog tools

	- To save on power on the boat, we began using technology as little as possible
	- When there is a crank/pedal, human-powered versions of something, we'll choose that.
	- We Look up info on sailings routes in books, or using physical maps.
	- Hard copies need no charging, and never die on you unexpectedly.
	- To save on power on the boat, we began using as little technology as possible
	- When there is a crank/pedal, human-powered version of something, we'll choose that.
	- We look up info on sailings routes in books, or refer to physical maps.
		- We had a few devices and batteries fail during our time in the Pacific.
	- Hard copies need no charging, and never die on you unexpectedly. 

NAME [toy] 2.6 Power solutions
FILL 03


@@ 207,7 214,7 @@ HEAD Adapting our`projects to`available resources.
	- Decided that we were satisfied with the speed of our current devices.
	- But we were not satisfied with how software made use of that hardware.
	- We migrated maps, calendars, TODOS, and daily maintenance tools to paper.
	- Like we changed halogens for LEDs, we replaced electron apps for native apps.
	- Like how we changed halogens for LEDs, we replaced electron apps for native apps.
	- We prioritized foss programs so we could inspect their inner workings 
		and audit where they spent cycles.



@@ 235,17 242,17 @@ PICT media/signal.tga
GOTO 09,12
HEAD Connectivity`too became`an issue

	- Away from land, evidently, connectivity became an issue.
	- When away from land, evidently, connectivity too became an issue.
		- We need internet to push updates, or to look up information.
	- In Nuku Hiva, we'd to cafe ashore for a connection.
		- Shared space with chickens.
	- In Nuku Hiva in FP, we'd go to a cafe ashore for a connection.
		- We shared space with chickens.
		- We thought roosters would only crow in the morning,
		- But no, they crow all day, seemingly for no good reason.
	- Connection there slow.
	- One morning Devine was sitting cafe, struggling update Xcode. 
	- The connection there was very slow, but we had no other option.
	- One morning Devine was sitting at the cafe, struggling to update Xcode. 
		- That was the day we met another IOs developer and sailor
		- Also struggling to download same 10G update.
		- We bonded over this struggle.
		- Also struggling to download that same 10G update.
		- We bonded over this struggle, which persisted through the South Pacific.
	- We cursed at those who thought an update that size was reasonable.

NAME [rek] 3.1 Internet problems


@@ 257,18 264,20 @@ HEAD When the internet`isn't a click away...
GOTO 08,19
TEXT Cloud services fail`Devices brick`Cannot look up information as we need it

	- The more West we went, the more problems we accumulated.
	- The further we went, the more problems we accumulated.
	- Spend enough time away from internet, and phones brick when they can't call home.
		- Happened to friend. Common nowadays to use phones to navigate at sea. 
		- Common nowadays to use phones to navigate at sea. 
		- Dangerous if it keeps you from finding your way in the middle of nowhere.
	- On a bad connection, we don't have access to source files stored on the cloud.
		- Javascript-heavy interfaces were impossble to load on a shitty connection.
	- Even when we DO have internet, it is usually slow and, or expensive.
	- Sometimes had to raise the phone up the mast to push updates online.
	- Help stops being a click away.
	- On a bad connection, we didn't have access to source files stored on the cloud.
		- Javascript-heavy interfaces were impossible to load.
		- We could only sync our data when we reached NZ, a whole ocean away.
	- Even when we DO have internet, in many places it is usually slow and costs a fortune.
	- We sometimes had to raise the phone up the mast to push updates online.
	- With limited connectivity, help stops being a click away.
			- Can't go to stackoverflow for answers.
	- With limited bandwith
		- Start adding up the number of pages you need to load to get to the info you need, hoping the site doesn't have too many images, or videos on auto-play. Such is the horror of the modern internet.
		- We had to start adding up the number of pages we needed to load to get to the info we needede, hoping the site didn't have too many images, or videos on auto-play. 
		- Such is the horror of the modern internet.

NAME [toy] 3.2 Internet solutions
FILL 03


@@ 295,16 304,19 @@ PICT media/hostileocean.tga
GOTO 04,04
HEAD Boats exist`in a hostile`environment.

	- Another problem is that boats exist hostile environment. 
	- Salt and Weather are two big issues for us.
	- Another problem is that boats exist in a very hostile environment. 
	- Oceans are large, wild spaces between continents.
		- Humans, blinded by hubris, build/wear boats like armor to cross them. Madness.
	- Salt and Weather are two big issues for us.
	- Sailing long passages, hard on the body/mind, also hard on hardware.
		- Electronics don’t last.
	 Electronics don't like moisture, or salt.
		- Makes them corrodes fast.
		- Big problem for us. Depend on electronics to work.
	- Weather, temperature, all that affects us. If it's too cold, or too hot, too sluggish to work, devices shut down too. If weather is bad, our attention shifts to the boat.
	 	- They don't like moisture and salt.
		- They fall prey to corrosion, become unusable.
		- That's a big problem for us. Because we depend on electronics to work.
	- Weather, temperature, all that affects us. 
		- If it's too cold, or too hot, we become too sluggish to work.
		- In -30C, or plus 40C, devices shut down too. We've had that happen.
	- If the weather is bad, our attention shifts to the boat.
	- Have to be rdy to stop what we're doing at any point, esp when the weather changes.

NAME [rek] 4.1 Salt & Weather problem


@@ 317,11 329,12 @@ GOTO 08,19
TEXT When working, being inflexible results in frustration,`at sea, being inflexible can kill you.

	- As other sailors have told us. "If you want to make God laugh, tell them about your plans."
	- Above is true when our limits are set by nature.
	- Heard stories of sailors leaving in bad weather to get to a meeting on time.
		- Only to perish in storm.
	- When working, being inflexible = frustration, 
		- But at sea, being inflexible = kill you.
	- The above is true when limits are set by nature.
	- We heard many stories of sailors leaving in bad weather, to get to a meeting on time.
		- Only to perish in a storm.
		- The wind doesn't care about your plans.
	- When working, being inflexible can earn you some frustration, 
		- But at sea, being inflexible can kill you.

NAME [toy] 4.2 Salt & Weather solutions
FILL 03


@@ 345,20 358,20 @@ GOTO 04,15
HEAD Have things work`when you need`them to

	- When sailing we want to have things work when we need them to.
		- Being away from cities forces us to to fix things, and to carry what we need to make those repairs.
			- Because parts not always available
			- Neither is access to repair shops
	- Having redundancy is a good thing.
	- Cooking on Pino
		- We have alcohol, wood and LPG.
	- To charge batteries
		- We have solar, generator, engine alternator
		- Spending time away from cities forces us to to fix things, and to carry what we need to make those repairs.
			- Because parts not always available.
			- Neither is access to repair shops.
	- Having redundancy on the ocean is a good thing.
	- For cooking on Pino
		- Our galley is set up to cook with alcohol, wood and propane.
	- To charge our batteries
		- We have solar panels, a gas generator, and our engine's alternator
	- We're not fans of all-in-one tools. 
		- They are convenient. 
		- But there is more chance break, or get in the way.
		- But there is more chance they'll break, or get in the way.
	- A hand-operated grain mill is good example of a simple tool.
		- It grinds grains. That's all it does.
		- Doesn't beat dough or bake bread for you.
		- Doesn't beat your dough or bake bread for you.
		- It's a time-tested design.
		- Does one thing well. 
		- Easy to inspect, making replacement parts is possible.


@@ 370,13 383,14 @@ PICT media/parallels.tga
GOTO 07,05
HEAD Learning to maintain a boat has`advised how we build software.

	- On boat, if electric water pressure broken. 
		- You cannot drink water. Not good. So use hand pumps
	- Or if can't heat space cause diesel heater failure, not good, woodstove.
	- On boat, if something happens and that we have no electricity. Depending on an electric water pressure system  means that we can't drink water. 
		- So, we use hand powered water pumps.
	- Our old diesel heater required electricity to work, while a woodstove does not.
	- Our boat came with a water heater, water pressure, electric windlass, electric diesel heater... we removed it all.
	- We instead prioritized designs that can be repaired.
	- When we mend, we believe it makes us care. 
		- And are more likely to keep maintaining.
	- We instead prioritized designs that we knew would not break easily.
		- Designs we knew we could repair.
	- When we mend, we realized that it makes us care. 
		- And because we are, we are more likely to keep maintaining.
	- We like to think that things we learnt working on the boat, we can now carry with us into application development.

NAME [toy] 6.2 Resilience computers


@@ 410,15 424,18 @@ PICT media/sailing2.tga
GOTO 28,05
HEAD Community.

	- We like to surround with ppl who know more.
	- Old salts are knowledgeable, and curious. 
	- In general, we like to surround with ppl who know more.
	- Most older sailors are very knowledgeable, and curious people. 
		- Eager to share, teach & lend tools.
	- Sailor websites, esp older ones, treasure trove of information.
		- Traveled with text documents, compendiums put together by hundreds of sailors over the years.
		- Updated every year, with every passing cohort.
		- Contain info on where to get parts, food, location of hospitals, nagivational hazards.
	- A lot of collaboration in long-distance sailor community.
		- Info is available, not hidden behind pay-walls.
	-  Friends of ours had dry rot on their wooden hull, and a neighbor with a wooden boat found out about it, he dropped what he was doing and went to help them right away.
		- We never experienced this kind of camraderie when living in a city.
	- Many sailor have personal websites, esp. older sailors. They are a treasure trove of information.
		- The goal is always to share knowledge.
	- We traveled with information gathered from such websites. Some sailors even put together thick compendiums for different countries, with input by hundreds of sailors.
		- The compendium was updated every year, with every passing cohort.
		- It contained detailed information on where to get parts, local food tips, the location of hospitals, a list of navigational hazards etc.
	- There is a LOT of collaboration in the long-distance sailor community.
		- Information is available, not hidden behind pay-walls.

NAME [rek] 7.1 Documentation Projects
FILL 03


@@ 427,11 444,11 @@ PICT media/needle.tga
GOTO 04,08
HEAD Context is the`connecting`thread.

	- To collect what we learned, we created knowledge base, a wiki.
	- To collect what we learned over the years, we created knowledge base, a wiki.
	- Every tool, book, story, everything we make is bound together
	- And the wiki serves as the connecting thread
	- Wiki also doubles as context for our work
		- Relevant as a whole.
		- Relevant in its entirety.

NAME [rek] 7.2 Documentation Projects
FILL 03


@@ 443,7 460,7 @@ GOTO 08,1c
TEXT Context creates empathy,`Offline wiki used as reference,`Collecting knowledge worth passing on

	- Providing stories of what led us to make software in that specific way is like weaving a needle through a set of events in our lives, binding them together to create a relatable whole. 
		- Unsaid things leave too much to interpretation.
		- Unsaid things, we think, leaves too much to interpretation.
	- Context creates empathy, something that is essential on the modern internet.
	- Websites double as offline reference (for us)
	- Collection learned things, things want to remember, techniques tried and tested, worth passing on.


@@ 476,12 493,11 @@ TEXT Uxn is a virtual machine that allows us to bring software onto any platform
	- After loosing our older software to the bitrot of one disapointing ecosystem to the next, 
		we decided to try to build our own.
	- We found that writing graphical applications(even in C), has a lot of portability issues.
		- For example: One of our device is a plan 9 workstation.
	- But even beyond portability, building a C graphical applications is much heavier and slower 
		than simply assembling a rom.
	- After experimenting with virtual machines like Another World & Flash
		- and building games for the NES.
	- We decided to build our own little vm as a target to build our tools for.
	- But even beyond portability, building a graphical application in C is much heavier and slower 
		than simply assembling a rom for an emulator.
	- What I mean by virtual machines here, is a compatibility layer between a program's logic and the host system API. For example, the game Another World relies on a simple graphical VM similar to Flash. Porting the game, means simply to create an emulator that will be able to navigate this bytecode.
	- As an experiment, we ported a few of our programs to the NES
	- Then, We decided to build our own little vm as a target to host our tools.
	- It has 32 opcodes, it's implemented in about a 100 lines of C89.
		- The emulator front-end is about a thousand, we have emulators for nearly every portable handheld and system.
	- It has only 64kb of memory, but we found that this is enough for most things


@@ 500,7 516,7 @@ HEAD Designed for`disassembly
		- that runs on each of our device.
	- The specs of this computer is often called a one-page computer
		- the mathematical definition of the vm fits on a napkin or on a t-shirt.
	- We spend less time messing with environments, and more time playing.
	- We waste less time setting up environments, and spend more time playing.

NAME [rek] Outro
FILL 03


@@ 513,7 529,7 @@ HEAD A polyculture`of tools.
	- The sad thing is that attempts at creating new computing ecosystems is often discouraged and met with ridicule. 
		- The constant reliance on the modern tech stack creates programmers who can only stitch solutions together in frameworks, but not people who can directly solve problems.
		- This in turn, creates a vulnerable monoculture of tools.
	- A plurality of ways to use computers encourages investing in activities whoses value no depend on ability to make capital.
	- A plurality of ways to use computers encourages investing in activities whoses value doesn't depend on the ability to make capital.
		- The road there is not easy, but to pursue popular interests, also means competing against everyone.

NAME [rek] Outro