~pi/aka

eb3bd5994f556948cbb249ece77da21aea0f646f — Paul Ivanov 1 year, 1 month ago 3df4daf
tested on 3 platforms
1 files changed, 10 insertions(+), 5 deletions(-)

M README
M README => README +10 -5
@@ 8,7 8,8 @@ Usage: aka alias               show stored aliases

By default, aliases are stored in the `.aka` file of the current working
directory. Optionally, the location of that file can be modified by setting the
AKA_FILE enviornment variable.
AKA_FILE enviornment variable. Tested on Debian, OpenBSD, and OpenWRT, aka uses
portable shell syntax and should work everywhere that has typical /bin/sh


Examples:


@@ 55,18 56,22 @@ Everything that is not aliased will get executed as a regular command.

## How it works

aka gets executed via /bin/sh, sources AKA_FILE and evals the positional
parameters, thus applying aliases and whatever other shell script shenanigans
stored in AKA_FILE.
aka is a tiny portable shell script that gets executed via /bin/sh, sources
AKA_FILE and evals the positional parameters, thus applying aliases and
whatever other shell script shenanigans stored in AKA_FILE.

For example, this means that you can put something like

    alias my='AKA_FILE=~/.my_rc aka'
    alias my='AKA_FILE=~/.my_aliases aka'

in your shell's startup files, and thereafter use the `my` command as an `aka`
invocation that always sources ~/.my_aliases file in your home directory,
regardless of where you run it.

## Installation

Grab aka, make it executable, and place it somewhere in your path.

## Notes

Initial prototype uses aliases, which may not work for programs that depend on