~mrlee/www.leemeichin.com

8df578b5d195f0225f556bf4dc8252115d4ae945 — Lee Meichin 16 days ago 3d0a122
Blockquotes
3 files changed, 32 insertions(+), 25 deletions(-)

M posts/agile-lipstick.org
M posts/enough.org
M posts/the-goose-is-out.org
M posts/agile-lipstick.org => posts/agile-lipstick.org +16 -13
@@ 18,24 18,27 @@ The subject of this topic, the Agile Manifesto◊^[5], was penned in 2001, twent

The first line of the manifesto is this:

◊blockquote{
#+begin_quote
  We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it.
}
#+end_quote

The manifesto, at that point in time, was conceived via the process of introspection and adaptation. I actually think this is the most important part of the manifesto because it tells you how they came to the conclusion they did. By extension, do the same and you may yourself find things that you value over others.

◊blockquote{
#+begin_quote
  Through this work we have come to value:
}
#+end_quote

/This work} is their iterative process. As if to reinforce the previous understanding, they discovered a pattern throughout and realised that things they valued ◊em{more/ when developing software were:
/This work/ is their iterative process. As if to reinforce the previous understanding, they discovered a pattern throughout and realised that things they valued /more/ when developing software were:

◊blockquote{
  ◊p{Individuals and interactions}
  ◊p{Working software}
  ◊p{Customer collaboration}
  ◊p{Responding to change}
}
#+begin_quote
  Individuals and interactions
  
  Working software
  
  Customer collaboration
  
  Responding to change
#+end_quote

It bothers me just how easily such valuable things as change, collaboration and interaction are discarded in favour of rigid process and other varied forms of control-freakery, trying to change the future through a cascading sequence of futile interventions instead of changing the way you do things or the way you are.



@@ 50,9 53,9 @@ Fuck that noise, just put the agile lipstick on your pig instead! Throw in a dai
Now /that/ is easy.

◊footnotes{
  ◊^[1]{◊<>["https://www.coachingdevelopment.com/"] - if you're based in London or Ireland this is /so} worth it./
  ◊^[1]{◊<>["https://www.coachingdevelopment.com/"] - if you're based in London or Ireland this is /so/ worth it./
  ◊^[2]{◊<>["https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_September"]}
  ◊^[3]{◊<>["https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6865/9780321934116"]}
  ◊^[4]{◊<>["https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6865/9781118127308"]}
  ◊^[5]{◊<>["https://agilemanifesto.org/"]}
}
\ No newline at end of file
}

M posts/enough.org => posts/enough.org +11 -7
@@ 18,15 18,19 @@ And... it's the classic case of doing less with more. The prospect of doing some

I'm reminded of the Politician's Syllogism◊^[1], which in this case would sound like this:

◊blockquote{
  ◊p{To be productive, I must do something}
  ◊p{I am doing something}
  ◊p{Therefore, I am being productive}
}
#+begin_quote
  To be productive, I must do something
  
  I am doing something
  
  Therefore, I am being productive
#+end_quote

It's a circular definition and it also makes me think of the first time an agile team tries to write a user story:

◊blockquote{So that I can log in / As a user / I need a log in system}
#+begin_quote
So that I can log in / As a user / I need a log in system
#+end_quote

The problem with defining a problem in terms of itself is that it looks like you're doing something for the sake of it. No one really benefits from anything done for the sake of it, but it'll feel good and it'll likely come with a cost.



@@ 58,4 62,4 @@ Do I behave like I am? Not at all.

◊footnotes{
  ◊^[1]{◊<>["https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politician%27s_syllogism"]}
}
\ No newline at end of file
}

M posts/the-goose-is-out.org => posts/the-goose-is-out.org +5 -5
@@ 16,11 16,11 @@ Let's get one thing out of the way before I continue: yes, there are people out 

◊hr{}

 For some reason I was reminded of an Osho story◊^[3] that was told at one of the retreats I went to. It was probably in one of the Osho books I read too but I couldn't tell you which one. It adapted the riddle of the goose in the bottle and turned it into an allegory of sorts.
For some reason I was reminded of an Osho story◊^[3] that was told at one of the retreats I went to. It was probably in one of the Osho books I read too but I couldn't tell you which one. It adapted the riddle of the goose in the bottle and turned it into an allegory of sorts.

◊blockquote{
  If a man puts a gosling into a bottle and feeds him until it is fully grown, how can the man get the goose out without killing it or breaking the bottle?
}
#+begin_quote
If a man puts a gosling into a bottle and feeds him until it is fully grown, how can the man get the goose out without killing it or breaking the bottle?
#+end_quote

The story describes the obvious paradox of the situation: you can either break the bottle and keep the goose, or you can kill the goose and keep the bottle. You can't have both though. Ultimately, you are the goose and the bottle is your ego and the act of meditation allows you to become aware of your ego, outside of it, without breaking it.



@@ 53,4 53,4 @@ So, would I recommend this kind of thing to anyone? Honestly, no. It's not the k
  ◊^[4]{◊<>["https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breathwork"]}
  ◊^[5]{◊<>["https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somatic_experiencing"]}
  ◊^[6]{◊<>["https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tantra"]}
}
\ No newline at end of file
}