~mrlee/www.kamelasa.dev

3ab087a336c528d74b905f5b506608a38234b1f5 — Lee Machin 25 days ago 1227556 basecamp
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---
title: It doesn't have to be political at work
date: 20201-05-17
category: work
status: draft
---

"It Doesn't Have To Be Political At Work," the most recent opus of the two Basecamp founders David Hanemeier Hannson and Jason Fried, details in simple English how you, too, can avoid an unpleasant workplace. Amongst its teachings are: remove paternalistic benefits! Stop 360 reviews! And dismantle committees!

Unfortunately, this book has not flown off the shelf in the same way previous Basecamp titles have.

---

I'm not the only one who has respected Basecamp's historical take on work. If you read their books and their blog posts, you'll see a company that contradicts the usual Silicon Valley success story. They had less than sixty people on staff, they turn down VC funding, their pricing model is remarkably simple (being both too expensive and too cheap at the same time), and they have a lot to say about their pay structure and remote work ethic: everyone is paid _handsomely_, regardless of their location.

This, of course, must create an almost cult-like ethos within Basecamp. There are few companies like them that are also as vocal as them, and there's a reason many engineers like myself have seen this external presentation of Basecamp as a role model. But, cult-like indeed - I have yet to work in a company that does not internally develop an exaggerated expression of itself and see themselves as challengers to some status quo. To some extent I think it's unavoidable, it's motivational leadership that gets everyone on the same team, but it can become blind to reality and unreceptive to cricticism.

So it was with Basecamp as we found out that a list of silly names was behind a total and utter collapse of integrity and leadership. I'm not going to go into that specifically though, let's keep it high level.

Basecamp from my perspective, or perhaps its founders,  have rather spectacularly demonstrated the difference between thought leadership and practical leadership. Their published works are still relevant, they don't suddenly become so after this, but this now feels like a lot of ideal thinking that was unlikely to have been put into practice.


A posts/it-doesnt-have-to-be-political-at-work.md~ => posts/it-doesnt-have-to-be-political-at-work.md~ +16 -0
@@ 0,0 1,16 @@
---
title: It doesn't have to be political at work
date: 20201-05-17
category: work
status: draft
---

"It Doesn't Have To Be Political At Work," the most recent opus of the two Basecamp founders David Hanemeier Hannson and Jason Fried, details in simple English how you, too, can avoid an unpleasant workplace. Amongst its teachings are: remove paternalistic benefits! Stop 360 reviews! And dismantle committees!

Unfortunately, this book has not flown off the shelf in the same way previous Basecamp titles have.

---

I'm not the only one who has respected Basecamp's historical take on work. If you read their books and their blog posts, you'll see a company that contradicts the usual Silicon Valley success story. They had less than sixty people on staff, they turn down VC funding, their pricing model is remarkably simple (being both too expensive and too cheap at the same time), and they have a lot to say about their pay structure and remote work ethic: everyone is paid _handsomely_, regardless of their location.

This, of course, must create an almost cult-like ethos within Basecamp. There are few companies like them that are also as vocal as them.
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