~kennylevinsen/greetd

3b7229bacdf7541fac8bc582db95163bc68e924d — Kenny Levinsen 1 year, 11 months ago d700309
Minor doc adjustments
2 files changed, 14 insertions(+), 8 deletions(-)

M README.md
M man/greetd-5.scd
M README.md => README.md +1 -1
@@ 56,7 56,7 @@ systemctl enable --now greetd

## How do I write my own greeter?

All you need to do is an application that can speak the greetd IPC protocol, which is documented in `greetd-ipc(7)`. See gtkgreet or agreety for inspiration.
All you need is an application that can speak the greetd IPC protocol, which is documented in `greetd-ipc(7)`. See gtkgreet or agreety for inspiration.

# How to discuss


M man/greetd-5.scd => man/greetd-5.scd +13 -7
@@ 68,10 68,13 @@ nor deserved its own section.
This section describes the default session, also referred to as the *greeter*.

*command* = command-line
	The command-line to run to start the default session, e.g. "agreety -c sway".
	The default session is automatically started when no other session is
	running, such as when user session terminate, and when greetd is initially
	started with no initial session configured.
	The command-line that greetd will run to start the default session, e.g.
	"agreety -c sway". The default session is automatically started when no
	other session is running, such as when a user session terminates or when
	greetd is initially started with no initial session configured.

	The command-line is run by *sh*(1), and as such accepts standard POSIX
	shell syntax.

	See *greetd-ipc*(7) for information on how a greeter can create sessions.



@@ 89,9 92,12 @@ issues whenever greetd or the greeter exit. This is checked through the
presence of the runfile.

*command* = command-line
	The command-line to run to start the initial session, e.g. "sway". The
	initial session will be run when exactly once when greetd is initially
	launched.
	The command-line that greetd will run to start the initial session, e.g.
	"sway". The initial session will be started exactly once when greetd is
	initially launched.

	The command-line is run by *sh*(1), and as such accepts standard POSIX
	shell syntax.

*user* = user
	The user to use for running the initial session.