~kennylevinsen/greetd-docs

070cf20fe43be912d9cc4ec26a43741ab63d71bf — Kenny Levinsen 6 months ago 5303213
Replace $SHELL with /bin/sh
1 files changed, 2 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)

M index.md
M index.md => index.md +2 -2
@@ 42,7 42,7 @@ See the `greetd-ipc(7)` manpage, and look at `agreety` or `gtkgreet` for inspira

1. Install [greetd](https://git.sr.ht/~kennylevinsen/greetd). If you are using Arch Linux, you can do this from AUR. Otherwise, follow the build instructions in the README of the project. This includes creating a user and installing the service file.

2. Open /etc/greetd/config.toml. The greeter should be set to `agreety --cmd $SHELL`, which logs you into a normal terminal session. Change this to `agreety --cmd sway` if you want it to start `sway`.
2. Open /etc/greetd/config.toml. The greeter should be set to `agreety --cmd /bin/sh`, which logs you into a normal terminal session. Change this to `agreety --cmd sway` if you want it to start `sway`.

## Setting up greetd with gtkgreet



@@ 206,7 206,7 @@ box#body {

## I installed and enabled greetd, but everything looks the same!

The default greetd configuration uses `agreety` (which looks just like `agetty` + `login`) to start your `$SHELL`. You shouldn't notice any big difference unless you check the process tree with something like `htop`, and see that you are in fact a child process of `greetd`.
The default greetd configuration uses `agreety` (which looks just like `agetty` + `login`) to start `/bin/sh`. You shouldn't notice any big difference unless you check the process tree with something like `htop`, and see that you are in fact a child process of `greetd`.

You can change the configuration as mentioned in the steps above to make `agreety` start another login environment of your choice (e.g. `sway`), or use a different greeter altogether.