~jbauer/knowledgebase

34443f7a9e707e843a1735d975cf204337bdfd42 — Jake Bauer 4 months ago 61ae2d7
Update OpenBSD server overview
1 files changed, 5 insertions(+), 1 deletions(-)

M sysadmin/openbsd-server-overview.gmi
M sysadmin/openbsd-server-overview.gmi => sysadmin/openbsd-server-overview.gmi +5 -1
@@ 8,7 8,11 @@ This article gives an overview of the rationale and list of services running. Se

## Why OpenBSD?

OpenBSD ships with sensible and secure defaults. OpenBSD has excellent documentation: I can use the system to learn about the system instead of looking things up on half-baked, SEO-optimized, outdated articles. OpenBSD has straightforward and easy to manage system components (daemons, init system, updating, etc). OpenBSD doesn't randomly break or unexpectedly change things out from under you when there's an update (they let you know about changes well in advance of you needing to upgrade).
> Get used to minimalism and security: componentised, privilege-separated binaries in file-system jails. Most of all, forget your instincts to search Google and StackExchange for every parameter and function call: man pages are your new best friend.

=> https://learnbchs.org/ -- LearnBCHS.org

OpenBSD ships with sensible and secure defaults. OpenBSD has excellent documentation: I can use the system to learn about the system instead of looking things up on half-baked, SEO-optimized, outdated articles. OpenBSD has straightforward and easy to manage system components (daemons, init system, updating, etc). OpenBSD doesn't randomly break or unexpectedly change things out from under you when there's an update (they let you know about changes well in advance of you needing to upgrade). OpenBSD ships with a set of useful, well-written programs that make setting up a server a breeze (httpd, acme-client, relayd, etc.).

To summarize: OpenBSD isn't a pain.