~irimi1/manu.computer

db0256b97e6ab0150fbeef3e871510c273ef0aad — Manuel Groß 2 months ago 037afd7
weblog: Undraft [$]lwn link with subscriber link
1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)

M content/weblog/2020-01-16-the-dark-sides-of-expertise.md
M content/weblog/2020-01-16-the-dark-sides-of-expertise.md => content/weblog/2020-01-16-the-dark-sides-of-expertise.md +1 -3
@@ 3,11 3,9 @@ title = "The dark side of expertise"
date = 2020-01-16T12:58:41+01:00
template = "weblogentry.html"

draft = true

[extra]
  microtype = "favourite"
  link = "https://lwn.net/Articles/809556/"
  link = "https://lwn.net/SubscriberLink/809556/aeb90da15d396c5b/"
+++

> Everyone has expertise in some things, which is normally seen as a good thing to have. But Dr. Sean Brady gave some examples of ways that our expertise can lead us astray, and actually cause us to make worse decisions, in a keynote at the 2020 linux.conf.au. Brady is a forensic engineer who specializes in analyzing engineering failures to try to discover the root causes behind them. The talk gave real-world examples of expertise gone wrong, as well as looking at some of the psychological research that demonstrates the problem. It was an interesting view into the ways that our brains work—and fail to work—in situations where our expertise may be sending our thoughts down the wrong path.