linux-tkg

TKG patches taken from here and the CPU optimization patch from here. All kernels feature the BMQ I/O scheduler, fsync patches, and more.

Two variants of each kernel are available, along with -header packages:

Templates are available on the linux-tkg branch of my void-packages fork.

How To Install From My Repo

  1. Add my repo.
  2. Update your package index: xbps-install -S
  3. Install the package: xbps-install linux5.13-tkg-bmq
  4. Reboot! Note that the kernel may be listed below the stock Void kernel and you may need to manually select it in grub.

How To Build From My Template

  1. Clone my fork of void-packages, or add it as a remote to an existing clone. Ensure you are on the linux-tkg branch.
  2. Create or update your xbps-src bootstrap env as needed.
  3. Build the packages (this takes a long time): ./xbps-src pkg linux5.13-tkg-bmq
  4. Install from your local repo: xbps-install --repository=./hostdir/binpkgs/linux-tkg linux5.13-tkg-bmq
  5. Reboot! Note that the kernel may be listed below the stock Void kernel and you may need to manually select it in grub.

Tips

Boot Into This Kernel

You can find the index for each of your installed kernels like this:

grep 'menuentry ' /boot/grub/grub.cfg | cut -f 2 -d "'" | nl -v -1
    -1	Void GNU/Linux
     0	Void GNU/Linux, with Linux 5.9.12_2
     1	Void GNU/Linux, with Linux 5.9.12_2 (recovery mode)
     2	Void GNU/Linux, with Linux 5.9.12-tkg-muqss_1
     3	Void GNU/Linux, with Linux 5.9.12-tkg-muqss_1 (recovery mode)

In this example, you can set your GRUB_DEFAULT value in /etc/default/grub to "1>2" to boot into the TKG kernel by default (be sure to run update-grub after making this change to apply it).

If you've got both an official linuxN.N package as well as a TKG kernel of the corresponding version, in most cases "1>2" should enable you to boot into the TKG kernel.

Read here for more information about Grub2 submenus.