~glyph/website

b89b0cc819376c18d8007f7abd0f1d99b8b89d97 — glyph 4 months ago db049f5 css_tweaks
Add minor style changes to improve layout and readibility
2 files changed, 12 insertions(+), 5 deletions(-)

M templates/base.html.tera
M templates/fungi/photo_guide.html.tera
M templates/base.html.tera => templates/base.html.tera +10 -3
@@ 31,6 31,8 @@
      body {
        max-width: 900px;
        font-family: monospace;
        line-height: 1.4;
        margin: 2rem;
      }
      
      code {


@@ 52,7 54,6 @@
        }
      }
      
        
      .flex-grid {
        display: flex;
      }


@@ 104,8 105,14 @@
        text-decoration: none;
      }
      
      p {
        padding: 0.5rem;
      p.bordered {
        border: solid 1px #111;
        padding: 2rem;
      }

      figure {
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
      }
    </style>
  </head>

M templates/fungi/photo_guide.html.tera => templates/fungi/photo_guide.html.tera +2 -2
@@ 6,7 6,7 @@
      <i>25 August, 2020</i>
      <h3>Introduction</h3>
      <p>The blessing and curse of becoming known for your interest in a particular topic is the increasing number of questions you receive. As a keen mycophile, I am frequently sent photos of mushrooms and asked for assistance in identifying them. More often than not, I receive a single photo taken from directly above the mushroom, without any mention of contextual data such as where the photo was taken and during which season. This derth of data makes it very difficult to positively identify the mushroom to genus or species level. With that in mind, I thought it might be useful to write a short guide on photography for the purposes of mushroom identification.</p>
      <p style="border: 1px solid black;"><i>When first beginning your journey into mushroom identification, it may be tempting to take a field guide with you to assist with identifications - I know this is how I started off. However, I've found that I prefer taking photos while in the field and doing the identification work and research at home. This allows me to focus on observation while in the field and avoid the frustration of paging through often-inadequate field guides. Find what works for you.</i></p>
      <p class="bordered"><i>When first beginning your journey into mushroom identification, it may be tempting to take a field guide with you to assist with identifications - I know this is how I started off. However, I've found that I prefer taking photos while in the field and doing the identification work and research at home. This allows me to focus on observation while in the field and avoid the frustration of paging through often-inadequate field guides. Find what works for you.</i></p>
      <h3>Capturing Morphological Traits</h3>
      <p>Mushrooms are often best identified by observing and listing their morphological traits. These may include the shape of the cap - both from above and in profile, the structure and colour of the hymenium, the colouration of the stem, the structure of the ring (if present) etc. Species within a genus often look identical at a glance and may require careful delineation based on a single characteristic. As such, it's very important to take clear photographs which collectively capture all of these characteristics (or the lack thereof). A minimum of three photos should do the trick:</p>
      <p><b>Top-view</b>: captures the shape, colour and texture of the mushroom as seen from above.</p>


@@ 35,7 35,7 @@
        <img src="/fungi/photo_guide/spore_print.jpg" style="width: 100%;" alt="Black sporeprint on white, ruled paper" />
        <figcaption>Black spores from a mushroom in the Panaeolus genus.</figcaption>
      </figure>
      <p style="border: 1px solid black;"><i>Bear in mind that you don't need fancy equipment to photograph mushrooms for the purpose of identification. I've been using the same simple Sony digital point-and-shoot since 2011. Also, don't be afraid to get close-up to your subject (the mushroom). The details often prove to be very important!</i></p>
      <p class="bordered"><i>Bear in mind that you don't need fancy equipment to photograph mushrooms for the purpose of identification. I've been using the same simple Sony digital point-and-shoot since 2011. Also, don't be afraid to get close-up to your subject (the mushroom). The details often prove to be very important!</i></p>
      <h3>Capturing Ecological Context</h3>
      <p>In addition to photos of the mushroom itself, it can be incredibly helpful to collect data concerning the context in which the mushroom is growing. The key considerations in this regard are the substrate and habitat: What is the mushroom growing on? Where is it growing? And what is growing or living around it? Having photos of these contextual factors can make a big difference when identifying a mushroom or genus or species-level. A minimum of two photos will suffice:</p>
      <p><b>Substrate-attachment</b>: captures the substrate on which the mushroom is growing. Try to observe beyond the obvious: if it's growing from the ground, is it growing on mulch, dung or from beneath the soil?</p>