~glyph/website

223415bb1d517163851fde714337f68f07e2caf3 — glyph 5 months ago e80e188
Fix typo and update lists
2 files changed, 9 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)

M templates/fungi/network_resilience.html.tera
M templates/lists.html.tera
M templates/fungi/network_resilience.html.tera => templates/fungi/network_resilience.html.tera +1 -1
@@ 5,7 5,7 @@
      <i>25 March, 2018</i>
      <p>Today I spent some more time reading through <i>Fungi in the Environment</i>, particularly the chapter titled “Natural history of the fungal hypha: how Woronin bodies support a multicellular lifestyle” by Gregory Jedd. I’m sharing a bit of it here since I think Woronin bodies, and fungal evolutionary history more broadly, has some metaphorical relevance to the Scuttleverse. My thoughts and presentation here are very rough but I intend on refining them iteratively.</p>
      <p>Some fungi have perforated walls (septa) between their cells. Septal pores (openings between cells) allow the cellular contents of the mycelial network to flow through the cells. This is known as protoplasmic streaming and sometimes includes cellular nuclei in addition to other organelles (intracellular modules).</p>
      <p>When experiencing damage, stress, old age, or during cellular differentiation, these fungi are able to selectively seal the septal pores in some of their cells. For example, when an insect takes a bit out of a mycelial network, cells adjacent to the destroyed / damaged cells prevent the leaking of protoplasm by sealing their pores. In this sense, they are self-healing and responsive to unanticipated changes in network integrity.</p>
      <p>When experiencing damage, stress, old age, or during cellular differentiation, these fungi are able to selectively seal the septal pores in some of their cells. For example, when an insect takes a bite out of a mycelial network, cells adjacent to the destroyed / damaged cells prevent the leaking of protoplasm by sealing their pores. In this sense, they are self-healing and responsive to unanticipated changes in network integrity.</p>
      <p>Different fungi take different approaches to halting and resuming protoplasmic streaming. One method of sealing septal pores is via Woronin bodies - bundles of HEX-1, a self-assembling structural protein, tethered to the pore opening. These Woronin bodies are essentially plugs which are pulled into position when required and may be sealed-over in the process of recovering from damage to adjacent cells.</p>
      <blockquote cite="http://www.cambridge.org/ru/academic/subjects/life-sciences/plant-science/fungi-environment">
        <p>the fungal colony can be thought of as a mass of protoplasm that migrates through a growing, interconnected system of channels. The early-diverging fungi (e.g. Zygomycota) grow well in the absence of vegetative septa; what then is the benefit of the perforate septum? Septal pores confer the advantage of protoplasmic streaming and intercellular continuity but are also sufficiently small to be rapidly closed. Thus, the syncytium can ‘cellularize’ in response to hyphal damage, stress or old age, and during cellular differentiation. Several mechanisms exist to close the septal pore; one of these is described in detail below. Interestingly, the fungi with the most prominent and complex septal-pore-associated organelles, the Hymenomycetes and Euascomycetes (Fig. 2.1), also produce the largest and most complex multicellular fruiting bodies (Alexopolous et al., 1996), suggesting that these organelles support complex multicellular organization.</p>

M templates/lists.html.tera => templates/lists.html.tera +8 -2
@@ 4,12 4,13 @@
    <h3>Books</h3>
    <p>Currently Reading</p>
    <ul>
      <li><i>Red Moon</i> - Kim Stanley Robinson</li>
      <li><i>Ready Player One</i> - Ernest Cline</li>
      <li><i>Radical Mycology</i> - Peter McCoy</li>
      <li><i>Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell</i> - Susanna Clarke</li>
    </ul>
    <p>Previously Read</p>
    <ul>
      <li><i>Red Moon</i> - Kim Stanley Robinson</li>
      <li><i>Mythago Wood</i> - Robert Holdstock</li>
      <li><i>The Name of the Wind</i> - Patrick Rothfuss</li>
    </ul>


@@ 24,6 25,11 @@
      <li><i>Deadly Class</i> - Rick Remender, Lee Loughridge and Wes Craig</li>
      <li><i>Saga</i> - Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples</li>
    </ul>
    <p>Previously Read</p>
    <ul>
      <li><i>Invisible Kingdom, Vol. 1</i> - G. Willow Wilson and Christian Ward</li>
      <li><i>Isola, Vol. 1</i> - Brenden Fletcher and Karl Kerschl</li>
    </ul>
    <p>Wishlist</p>
    <ul>
      <li><i>Trees</i> - Jason Howard and Warren Ellis</li>


@@ 42,8 48,8 @@
    <h3>Podcasts</h3>
    <p>Currently Listening</p>
    <ul>
      <li><a href="https://www.embedded.fm/" title="Embedded FM"><i>Embedded FM</i></a> - Elecia White and Chris White</li>
      <li><a href="https://www.indefenseofplants.com/podcast" title="In Defense of Plants podcast"><i>In Defense of Plants</i></a> - Matt</li>
      <li><a href="https://www.happinesslab.fm/" title="The Happiness Lab podcast"><i>The Happiness Lab</i></a> - Dr Laurie Santos</li>
    </ul>
    <hr>
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