~bt/pblog

3e173460459dd1c8e74c1abe4d95d655595e32c5 — Bradley Taunt 19 days ago 6377ddd master
Remove all mention of archived Codeberg repo
3 files changed, 6 insertions(+), 6 deletions(-)

M _output/blog/pblog-intro.html
M _output/feed.xml
M posts/pblog-intro.md
M _output/blog/pblog-intro.html => _output/blog/pblog-intro.html +2 -2
@@ 93,7 93,7 @@ code span.wa { color: #60a0b0; font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; } /* Warni
<nav id="TOC">
<ul><li><a href="#main-goal">Main Goal</a></li><li><a href="#site-structure">Site Structure</a></li><li><a href="#headers-and-footers">Headers and Footers</a></li><li><a href="#posts-and-pages">Posts and Pages</a></li><li><a href="#the-build-process">The Build Process</a></li><li><a href="#uploading-to-the-www">Uploading to the WWW</a></li><li><a href="#wrapping-up">Wrapping Up</a></li></ul>
</nav>
<p>This article is a <em>living document</em>. It will always have the most up-to-date information on getting started with <code>pblog</code>.</p><p><strong>Last Updated</strong>: July 27, 2022</p><hr /><p>Although this project was already <a href="/blog/pblog-launch.html">announced</a> a couple days ago, I thought it might be best to actually breakdown <code>pblog</code> into greater detail.</p><p>Enough chit-chat, let&rsquo;s get into it!</p><h3 id="main-goal">Main Goal</h3><p>The entire purpose of <code>pblog</code> is to be as bare-bones as possible, while still maintaining a pleasant writing workflow. Users write their posts and pages in Markdown - <em>pblog</em> handles everything else:</p><ul><li>Posts and pages generated via Pandoc with minimal CSS</li><li>RSS feed at <code>feed.xml</code></li><li>Generated blog listing at <code>blog/index.html</code></li><li>Browser-styled XML (in supported browsers)</li></ul><h3 id="site-structure">Site Structure</h3><p>After you&rsquo;ve cloned the <a href="https://codeberg.org/tdarb/pblog">official pblog repo on Codeberg</a>, the next thing you should do is edit the main <code>_config.sh</code> file in the root directory. This will give you a better understanding of how everything is built.</p><p>Once generated, <em>pblog</em> structures the final website files as such:</p><pre class="shell"><code>_output/
<p>This article is a <em>living document</em>. It will always have the most up-to-date information on getting started with <code>pblog</code>.</p><p><strong>Last Updated</strong>: July 27, 2022</p><hr /><p>Although this project was already <a href="/blog/pblog-launch.html">announced</a> a couple days ago, I thought it might be best to actually breakdown <code>pblog</code> into greater detail.</p><p>Enough chit-chat, let&rsquo;s get into it!</p><h3 id="main-goal">Main Goal</h3><p>The entire purpose of <code>pblog</code> is to be as bare-bones as possible, while still maintaining a pleasant writing workflow. Users write their posts and pages in Markdown - <em>pblog</em> handles everything else:</p><ul><li>Posts and pages generated via Pandoc with minimal CSS</li><li>RSS feed at <code>feed.xml</code></li><li>Generated blog listing at <code>blog/index.html</code></li><li>Browser-styled XML (in supported browsers)</li></ul><h3 id="site-structure">Site Structure</h3><p>After you&rsquo;ve cloned the <a href="https://git.sr.ht/~bt/pblog">official pblog repo on sourcehut</a>, the next thing you should do is edit the main <code>_config.sh</code> file in the root directory. This will give you a better understanding of how everything is built.</p><p>Once generated, <em>pblog</em> structures the final website files as such:</p><pre class="shell"><code>_output/
    |__blog/
        |__index.html
        |__blog-post-example.html


@@ 106,7 106,7 @@ code span.wa { color: #60a0b0; font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; } /* Warni
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb2-3" title="3"><span class="fu">date:</span><span class="at"> Mon, 04 Jul 2022</span></a>
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb2-4" title="4"><span class="ot">---</span></a></code></pre></div><p>while individual pages only require a <code>title</code>:</p><div class="sourceCode" id="cb3"><pre class="sourceCode yaml"><code class="sourceCode yaml"><a class="sourceLine" id="cb3-1" title="1"><span class="ot">---</span></a>
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb3-2" title="2"><span class="fu">title:</span><span class="at"> Page Title</span></a>
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb3-3" title="3"><span class="ot">---</span></a></code></pre></div><p>This makes for an easier switch over from other SSG platforms like Jekyll or Hugo.</p><h3 id="the-build-process">The Build Process</h3><p>The main variables at the top of the <code>pblog.sh</code> file need to edited with your own details before generating your website. Those variables are fairly self-explanatory and simple to edit.</p><p>All you need to do now is run <code>make</code> (or <code>make serve</code> if you&rsquo;re looking to test locally) and you&rsquo;re done. Your website should now be fully generated inside the include <code>_output</code> directory. For quick reference:</p><ol type="1"><li><em>pblog</em> converts your Markdown posts into two variations of HTML<ul><li>One is used specifically for rendering itself inside the RSS feed</li><li>The other is used for linking in a browser</li></ul></li><li>Next, <em>pblog</em> converts your Markdown pages into HTML</li><li>All of these generated HTML files are then moved to the <code>_output</code> folder</li></ol><p><em>pblog</em> is also smart enough to automatically generate a main blog list directory for you. This <code>index.html</code> file is placed inside the <code>_output/blog</code> folder on build. You can see an example of the blog list <a href="/blog">on this very website</a>.</p><h3 id="uploading-to-the-www">Uploading to the WWW</h3><p>Those with more experience will probably lean towards using a utility like <code>rsync</code> to sync the contents of their <code>_output</code> folder with their web server. For those with less experience, I recommend using something like <a href="https://app.netlify.com/drop">Netlify Drop</a> to make things as friction-less as possible.</p><h3 id="wrapping-up">Wrapping Up</h3><p>There isn&rsquo;t much else to say. <code>pblog</code> is as static or flexible as you chose it to be. If you have any ideas on how to improve things or come across any bugs, please <a href="https://codeberg.org/tdarb/pblog">open a ticket or PR on the official repo</a>.</p><p>Thanks and happy blogging with <em>pblog</em>!</p>
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb3-3" title="3"><span class="ot">---</span></a></code></pre></div><p>This makes for an easier switch over from other SSG platforms like Jekyll or Hugo.</p><h3 id="the-build-process">The Build Process</h3><p>The main variables at the top of the <code>pblog.sh</code> file need to edited with your own details before generating your website. Those variables are fairly self-explanatory and simple to edit.</p><p>All you need to do now is run <code>make</code> (or <code>make serve</code> if you&rsquo;re looking to test locally) and you&rsquo;re done. Your website should now be fully generated inside the include <code>_output</code> directory. For quick reference:</p><ol type="1"><li><em>pblog</em> converts your Markdown posts into two variations of HTML<ul><li>One is used specifically for rendering itself inside the RSS feed</li><li>The other is used for linking in a browser</li></ul></li><li>Next, <em>pblog</em> converts your Markdown pages into HTML</li><li>All of these generated HTML files are then moved to the <code>_output</code> folder</li></ol><p><em>pblog</em> is also smart enough to automatically generate a main blog list directory for you. This <code>index.html</code> file is placed inside the <code>_output/blog</code> folder on build. You can see an example of the blog list <a href="/blog">on this very website</a>.</p><h3 id="uploading-to-the-www">Uploading to the WWW</h3><p>Those with more experience will probably lean towards using a utility like <code>rsync</code> to sync the contents of their <code>_output</code> folder with their web server. For those with less experience, I recommend using something like <a href="https://app.netlify.com/drop">Netlify Drop</a> to make things as friction-less as possible.</p><h3 id="wrapping-up">Wrapping Up</h3><p>There isn&rsquo;t much else to say. <code>pblog</code> is as static or flexible as you chose it to be. If you have any ideas on how to improve things or come across any bugs, please <a href="https://git.sr.ht/~bt/pblog">open a ticket or PR on the official repo</a>.</p><p>Thanks and happy blogging with <em>pblog</em>!</p>
</article><!-- Do not remove this closing article element -->

<!-- Content placed here will appear directly before the closing </body> tag -->

M _output/feed.xml => _output/feed.xml +2 -2
@@ 54,7 54,7 @@
<nav id="TOC">
<ul><li><a href="#main-goal">Main Goal</a></li><li><a href="#site-structure">Site Structure</a></li><li><a href="#headers-and-footers">Headers and Footers</a></li><li><a href="#posts-and-pages">Posts and Pages</a></li><li><a href="#the-build-process">The Build Process</a></li><li><a href="#uploading-to-the-www">Uploading to the WWW</a></li><li><a href="#wrapping-up">Wrapping Up</a></li></ul>
</nav>
<p>This article is a <em>living document</em>. It will always have the most up-to-date information on getting started with <code>pblog</code>.</p><p><strong>Last Updated</strong>: July 27, 2022</p><hr /><p>Although this project was already <a href="/blog/pblog-launch.html">announced</a> a couple days ago, I thought it might be best to actually breakdown <code>pblog</code> into greater detail.</p><p>Enough chit-chat, let&rsquo;s get into it!</p><h3 id="main-goal">Main Goal</h3><p>The entire purpose of <code>pblog</code> is to be as bare-bones as possible, while still maintaining a pleasant writing workflow. Users write their posts and pages in Markdown - <em>pblog</em> handles everything else:</p><ul><li>Posts and pages generated via Pandoc with minimal CSS</li><li>RSS feed at <code>feed.xml</code></li><li>Generated blog listing at <code>blog/index.html</code></li><li>Browser-styled XML (in supported browsers)</li></ul><h3 id="site-structure">Site Structure</h3><p>After you&rsquo;ve cloned the <a href="https://codeberg.org/tdarb/pblog">official pblog repo on Codeberg</a>, the next thing you should do is edit the main <code>_config.sh</code> file in the root directory. This will give you a better understanding of how everything is built.</p><p>Once generated, <em>pblog</em> structures the final website files as such:</p><pre class="shell"><code>_output/
<p>This article is a <em>living document</em>. It will always have the most up-to-date information on getting started with <code>pblog</code>.</p><p><strong>Last Updated</strong>: July 27, 2022</p><hr /><p>Although this project was already <a href="/blog/pblog-launch.html">announced</a> a couple days ago, I thought it might be best to actually breakdown <code>pblog</code> into greater detail.</p><p>Enough chit-chat, let&rsquo;s get into it!</p><h3 id="main-goal">Main Goal</h3><p>The entire purpose of <code>pblog</code> is to be as bare-bones as possible, while still maintaining a pleasant writing workflow. Users write their posts and pages in Markdown - <em>pblog</em> handles everything else:</p><ul><li>Posts and pages generated via Pandoc with minimal CSS</li><li>RSS feed at <code>feed.xml</code></li><li>Generated blog listing at <code>blog/index.html</code></li><li>Browser-styled XML (in supported browsers)</li></ul><h3 id="site-structure">Site Structure</h3><p>After you&rsquo;ve cloned the <a href="https://git.sr.ht/~bt/pblog">official pblog repo on sourcehut</a>, the next thing you should do is edit the main <code>_config.sh</code> file in the root directory. This will give you a better understanding of how everything is built.</p><p>Once generated, <em>pblog</em> structures the final website files as such:</p><pre class="shell"><code>_output/
    |__blog/
        |__index.html
        |__blog-post-example.html


@@ 67,7 67,7 @@
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb2-3" title="3"><span class="fu">date:</span><span class="at"> Mon, 04 Jul 2022</span></a>
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb2-4" title="4"><span class="ot">---</span></a></code></pre></div><p>while individual pages only require a <code>title</code>:</p><div class="sourceCode" id="cb3"><pre class="sourceCode yaml"><code class="sourceCode yaml"><a class="sourceLine" id="cb3-1" title="1"><span class="ot">---</span></a>
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb3-2" title="2"><span class="fu">title:</span><span class="at"> Page Title</span></a>
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb3-3" title="3"><span class="ot">---</span></a></code></pre></div><p>This makes for an easier switch over from other SSG platforms like Jekyll or Hugo.</p><h3 id="the-build-process">The Build Process</h3><p>The main variables at the top of the <code>pblog.sh</code> file need to edited with your own details before generating your website. Those variables are fairly self-explanatory and simple to edit.</p><p>All you need to do now is run <code>make</code> (or <code>make serve</code> if you&rsquo;re looking to test locally) and you&rsquo;re done. Your website should now be fully generated inside the include <code>_output</code> directory. For quick reference:</p><ol type="1"><li><em>pblog</em> converts your Markdown posts into two variations of HTML<ul><li>One is used specifically for rendering itself inside the RSS feed</li><li>The other is used for linking in a browser</li></ul></li><li>Next, <em>pblog</em> converts your Markdown pages into HTML</li><li>All of these generated HTML files are then moved to the <code>_output</code> folder</li></ol><p><em>pblog</em> is also smart enough to automatically generate a main blog list directory for you. This <code>index.html</code> file is placed inside the <code>_output/blog</code> folder on build. You can see an example of the blog list <a href="/blog">on this very website</a>.</p><h3 id="uploading-to-the-www">Uploading to the WWW</h3><p>Those with more experience will probably lean towards using a utility like <code>rsync</code> to sync the contents of their <code>_output</code> folder with their web server. For those with less experience, I recommend using something like <a href="https://app.netlify.com/drop">Netlify Drop</a> to make things as friction-less as possible.</p><h3 id="wrapping-up">Wrapping Up</h3><p>There isn&rsquo;t much else to say. <code>pblog</code> is as static or flexible as you chose it to be. If you have any ideas on how to improve things or come across any bugs, please <a href="https://codeberg.org/tdarb/pblog">open a ticket or PR on the official repo</a>.</p><p>Thanks and happy blogging with <em>pblog</em>!</p>]]></description>
<a class="sourceLine" id="cb3-3" title="3"><span class="ot">---</span></a></code></pre></div><p>This makes for an easier switch over from other SSG platforms like Jekyll or Hugo.</p><h3 id="the-build-process">The Build Process</h3><p>The main variables at the top of the <code>pblog.sh</code> file need to edited with your own details before generating your website. Those variables are fairly self-explanatory and simple to edit.</p><p>All you need to do now is run <code>make</code> (or <code>make serve</code> if you&rsquo;re looking to test locally) and you&rsquo;re done. Your website should now be fully generated inside the include <code>_output</code> directory. For quick reference:</p><ol type="1"><li><em>pblog</em> converts your Markdown posts into two variations of HTML<ul><li>One is used specifically for rendering itself inside the RSS feed</li><li>The other is used for linking in a browser</li></ul></li><li>Next, <em>pblog</em> converts your Markdown pages into HTML</li><li>All of these generated HTML files are then moved to the <code>_output</code> folder</li></ol><p><em>pblog</em> is also smart enough to automatically generate a main blog list directory for you. This <code>index.html</code> file is placed inside the <code>_output/blog</code> folder on build. You can see an example of the blog list <a href="/blog">on this very website</a>.</p><h3 id="uploading-to-the-www">Uploading to the WWW</h3><p>Those with more experience will probably lean towards using a utility like <code>rsync</code> to sync the contents of their <code>_output</code> folder with their web server. For those with less experience, I recommend using something like <a href="https://app.netlify.com/drop">Netlify Drop</a> to make things as friction-less as possible.</p><h3 id="wrapping-up">Wrapping Up</h3><p>There isn&rsquo;t much else to say. <code>pblog</code> is as static or flexible as you chose it to be. If you have any ideas on how to improve things or come across any bugs, please <a href="https://git.sr.ht/~bt/pblog">open a ticket or PR on the official repo</a>.</p><p>Thanks and happy blogging with <em>pblog</em>!</p>]]></description>
  <author>brad@bt.ht (Bradley Taunt)</author>
  <guid>https://pblog.bt.ht/blog/pblog-intro.html</guid>
  </item>

M posts/pblog-intro.md => posts/pblog-intro.md +2 -2
@@ 24,7 24,7 @@ The entire purpose of `pblog` is to be as bare-bones as possible, while still ma

### Site Structure

After you've cloned the [official pblog repo on Codeberg](https://codeberg.org/tdarb/pblog), the next thing you should do is edit the main `_config.sh` file in the root directory. This will give you a better understanding of how everything is built.
After you've cloned the [official pblog repo on sourcehut](https://git.sr.ht/~bt/pblog), the next thing you should do is edit the main `_config.sh` file in the root directory. This will give you a better understanding of how everything is built.

Once generated, *pblog* structures the final website files as such:



@@ 91,6 91,6 @@ Those with more experience will probably lean towards using a utility like `rsyn

### Wrapping Up

There isn't much else to say. `pblog` is as static or flexible as you chose it to be. If you have any ideas on how to improve things or come across any bugs, please [open a ticket or PR on the official repo](https://codeberg.org/tdarb/pblog).
There isn't much else to say. `pblog` is as static or flexible as you chose it to be. If you have any ideas on how to improve things or come across any bugs, please [open a ticket or PR on the official repo](https://git.sr.ht/~bt/pblog).

Thanks and happy blogging with *pblog*!
\ No newline at end of file