~bfiedler/website

6dc86059326ee7e479bab43fc6319f960077df36 — Ben Fiedler 5 months ago bbcbbc9
feedback from balz
1 files changed, 4 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)

M content/blog/build-your-own-wi-fi-antenna.md
M content/blog/build-your-own-wi-fi-antenna.md => content/blog/build-your-own-wi-fi-antenna.md +4 -4
@@ 27,7 27,7 @@ waves to a single point.

We built a basic parabolic receiving antenna using a 3D printer and a
female-female [N-connector](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N_connector),
available in any well-stocked electronics store. The most important part is
available in any well-stocked electronic parts store. The most important part is
the form of the parabola: it is described by the equation $y = x^2 / 4a$, where
$a$ is the *focal length*, i.e.  the distance from the center of the antenna to
the *focal point*, at which the signal is concentrated. Of course it is


@@ 52,9 52,9 @@ A friend of mine helped us model and print the antenna using
MK3S](https://shop.prusa3d.com/en/3d-printers/181-original-prusa-i3-mk3s-3d-printer.html).
Of course, any decent 3D modeling software and printer will do here.
Unfortunately, the surface of 3D prints commonly has a rough texture, which
lowers the effectiveness of the antenna. We fixed this by taping sponge rubber
in the dish and covering the now smoother surface in aluminium tape. Both
materials can be bought cheaply in a hardware store.
lowers the effectiveness of the antenna. We fixed this by taping a high-density
rubber foam sheet in the dish and covering the now smoother surface in aluminium
tape. Both materials can be bought cheaply in a hardware store.

{{< figure class="resizable" src="/blog/img/antenna-build.png" alt="The finished antenna build" >}}